Tag Archive | white supremacy

Daily Bread (Week 26)

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I missed class this week because I was attending a gathering of UU Ministers at a local retreat center.  What a joy and a challenge it was! It is always a joy to gather with beloved friends and colleagues – those I have known for years and others that I just met this week.  The program was excellent and included a lot of prayerful singing – singing is something I don’t do well, but that doesn’t stop me from loving it.  I particularly enjoyed some of the conversations I had with the newer ministers and seminarians.  They hold the hope for the future, not only for our faith, but for the world.

No one understands a minister better than another minister.  While resting in the embrace of that mutual understanding, there were also challenges.  We are human and part of the larger culture and are not unaffected by the wider systems of power and privilege that bring such harm to those who are trying to survive on the margins.  I had to do my “Jeremiah” thing during a discussion of white supremacy where I witnessed a few “micro-aggressions.” It is so important to at least name those when they happen.

I am also realizing that I am completely out of patience with the “hurt feelings” of those who feel victimized when someone names the harm they have caused to others.  No one expects perfection.  If you blow it, when you make a mistake (and you will), apologize, and then SHUT THE F___ up and move on.  No one you have harmed wants to hear about how guilty you feel about it or how your intentions were pure.  Process those emotions with others who have similar identities to yours if you need to do so, but don’t redirect the attention of a larger group to your emotional distress.  Don’t make it about you.  This is work, very hard work indeed, that really needs to be done, again for our faith and for the world.  The blessing I felt is that everyone there at least wants to do the work, even we bumble and stumble along that journey toward justice making and beloved community where all are truly welcomed in the fullness of who they are.

The other challenge, for me at least, was the food.  (This is my weight management blog after all.)  The retreat center served very healthy, and mainly organic, food, so it was much easier than it might have been.  It was also super tasty.  I stressed some though, as I was not able to weigh or measure anything and I had to guess at the calories.  The lunches were vegetarian, so protein was harder to find and manage with no lean meat available.  It was also hard to pass by the awesome desserts and say to no to the social  hour wine.  I stayed strong on those last two, however, and next week’s weigh-in will tell me how well I did on estimating calories.  This was my Tuesday night dinner plate:

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Baked chicken with pesto sauce, roasted cauliflower, and a smidgeon of salad.  The salads were all pre-dressed, so I was careful with them.  My guess was around 340 calories.

I am also thinking about taking the test in the next few weeks that will tell me about my metabolism – how many calories I burn just breathing.  Knowing that number will help me calculate with more precision just how many calories I should be eating each day. It is not good to go too low because too few calories can slow your metabolism permanently and make long term weight loss more difficult.  Too many calories, and you don’t lose any weight.  The program includes one free metabolism test, and subsequent ones cost $50.  The recommendation is to wait and do the test when your weight loss slows, but I want to do it before then.  If it turns out I need another one later, I can just pay for it.  Given the investment I am making already – in money, time, and attention, I am not going to quibble over an extra 50 bucks if it will help.

There are maybe a couple of weeks left of swim season, before we need to close the pool for the winter.  I hope to catch up on my exercise goals this week.

 

L’Chaim!

(My stats for the last week – down ? pounds, drank over 7 gallons of water and exercised for  240 minutes.  My total weight loss so far is 57.6 pounds.)

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Intentions (for white people)

The road to hell may not be paved

But it is covered with the guano

Of our so-called good intentions

It’s a seagull shit so white

It covers the awareness

Of the pain we cause

By our fragility

 

If we slip and slide and blunder

And get bumps and bruises

On our egos

It is a small price to pay

So much smaller than the pain

Our ignorance has caused

 

Spirit give us the strength

To lean into the learning

May there be no rest

For the wicked

May there be healing

For the harm the “good” have done

Absolution will come later

If we can find together

A pathway to paradise

For all the hurting souls

 

 

 

 

 

Building a New Way – UUP 5/7/17 #UUWhiteSupremacyTeachIn

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Sermon notes:

A couple more short readings:

From THE INVISIBILITY OF WHITENESS By john a. powell

White people have the luxury of not having to think about race. That is a benefit of being white, of being part of the dominant group. Just like men don’t have to think about gender. The system works for you, and you don’t have to think about it.

So they live in white space and then they don’t have to think about it. First of all, they think about race as something that belongs to somebody else. The blacks have race; maybe Latinos have race; maybe Asians have race. But they’re just white. They’re just people. That’s part of being white.

from the Rev. Karen Quinlan,

But more often, I’m learning, true change happens only when we take the time and the risk of sitting with something hard. True change in the world is intimately related to our internal transformation, which is intimately related to our presence to our selves.

Culture is simply everything that’s around us. At some point in our lives, we learn that there are other ways of being. Our human tendency is to think that ours is better than theirs.

When we are white, thinking that ours is better is supported by the fact that our social and political systems have been built through the same frame through which we’re looking.

We learn that our way is the right way and the best way. Simply put, this is white supremacy culture.”

She also says, ‘Come on and look inside you–it’s the best place to start.’ The greatest revolution is a simple change of heart.’  So that is where I am going to start.  I am going to tell some stories about how I, as a white woman, learned about race and about white supremacy.  Just to be clear, white supremacy is the system we all live in, you don’t have to be a racist to participate in it, or, if you are white, benefit from it.  As I tell my story, you might want to reflect on whether your own is similar or not.

I grew up in Watsonville, CA, a relatively small, primarily agricultural town.  Unlike many white people who grew up in racially segregated suburbs, the town was very ethnically diverse and I was aware of that from an early age.  Many of my friend’s parents were first generation immigrants and English was their second language if they spoke it at all. Our next door neighbor, who took care of me while my mother worked, spoke mainly Portuguese.  I remember my mother explaining, when I was very young, that the town was settled by waves of immigrants who came mainly to work on the farms.  Italians, Slavonian’s, Portuguese, Germans, Filipinos, Japanese, Chinese, Okies, and Mexicans were the groups she mentioned.  I asked what we were, and she said Okies.  Everyone had an ethnicity of some sort in my mother’s opinion, and she used it to describe virtually everyone we knew.

Phyllis was my Chinese friend, John was Slavonian, David was my Jewish friend, and I was named after my mother’s German friend, Theresa.

I remember asking her what we were.  She said we were Okies.  She’d moved from Texas to California in the 1930’s to find work as a waitress in Hollywood.

I have been thinking about Jordan Edwards a lot this week.  He was the young African American teenager who was recently killed by the police in Texas.  He was only 15 and had been at a party with his brothers and some friends.  When someone said that the police had been called, they got in their car and tried to leave.  An officer shot at the departing car, and Jordan was killed by a bullet to his head.

I have been thinking about it a lot, partly because when I was a teenager I went to a friend’s party. Some of the kids were drinking and her parents called the cops.  We all got in our cars and tried to get away.  In a panic, my friend David backed his car into a muddy field and we got stuck, but finally managed to get the car out and get away. We were scared, but because we were white, our lives were not at risk.  The worst case scenario would have been a phone call to our parents and being grounded.  That was white supremacy at work although I did not realize it at the time.

I was not totally unaware of racism as a teen, however.  My US History teacher in high school, Mr. Hashimoto, had been interned with his family during WWII and talked about that on more than on occasion.

He also told us that it was because of racism that the US dropped the atom bomb on Japan rather than on Germany.  He taught me to question things.

In college, although I had the opportunity to hear Eldridge Cleaver, Angela Davis, Bobbie Seale and other Black Panthers speak during those turbulent times, it was also the first time I was exposed to a pretty monolithic white middle class culture.  Almost everyone in my dorm was white and most of them came from upper middle class white suburbs.  White supremacy became the water I swam in.

I saw the class issues, because I was a scholarship student, but my social life was almost completely white and I was clueless about it. We were all for racial justice, but we didn’t really know any black people at all. One thing I have learned over time, is that while ideas and values are good things, you can’t really know someone else unless you take the time to listen.  You can’t live our first principle without a deeper understanding of the inherent worth and dignity of all, which is so much more complicated than just accepting the sometimes very self-centered individualism of people with a lot of privilege.

I learned so much during my 25 years working for Social Security in Richmond CA.  With almost 2000 employees when I started, it was something like 40% African American with a good mix of other ethnic groups.  White people were not the majority, although something like 60% of the management staff was white.

What that meant is that people of color felt safe enough to talk about race and racism openly.

During the OJ Simpson trial, there was a clear racial divide and people argued about it.  Most of the white folks thought he was guilty, and most of the black folks wanted him to be freed.  When the verdict was announced, the black people cheered.  A black man accused of killing a white woman was declared innocent.  It was an historic event, something that rarely happens when you live under the thumb of white supremacy.  I learned something very real about the reality of black lives

Another conversation:

I shared with a black co-worker, a lay sermon I wrote about how Anne and I created our family as lesbian parents.  (It was my very first sermon.) She cried when she read it, and told me she thought her church was wrong in how they treated gay people.  She then told me of going to a sleepover camp where she was the only black child.  She was 9 or 10 and could not swim very well.  All of the other kids had swum out to a platform on the lake and she was left on the shore.  She gathered her strength and her courage and swam as best she could out to the platform.  She was exhausted when she got there, but when she tried to get on the platform to rest, the other kids wouldn’t let her.  I am not sure if they used the “N” word or not.  She did not say, but she cried again as she told me of almost drowning as she made her way back to shore.  I was so honored that she trusted me enough to share that story. I did not make any excuses for the kids who had been mean to her.  I just cried with her.

That story was a hard one, and I have more like that, but I have a few funny stories too.  My assistant manager Hazel was complaining that I got internet access at my desk before she did. She said it was racist, that all the black managers were going to be last.  I looked at her with a straight face and said, maybe, but maybe they are just giving the internet to all the gay managers first, because everyone knows how good we are at technology.  We laughed for a solid half an hour about that one.

Conversations about race can be difficult.  They can be uncomfortable.

The history is full of pain, and too often white people can get defensive because they don’t want to feel guilty.  The very term, white supremacy, is one that is particularly hard for those of us who consider ourselves liberal and certainly not racist.

But you don’t have to identify as a racist in order to acknowledge white privilege and that we live in a culture, a system, where white people and white culture is what is most highly valued.  It shows up in all kinds of decisions, including hiring, including within Unitarian Universalism, including in our headquarters, our regions and our congregations. Despite principles and written commitments to diversity, the white candidate is often seen as just the “better fit.”  My friends who are ministers of color know that they are less likely to be called to serve a UU congregation than are their white peers.

Straight white cisgender men are also still the most likely to be called to serve our larger churches.

Racism, sexism, homophobia, and transphobia are unfortunately very much alive within Unitarian Universalism.  It isn’t always blatant, and the specific instance can be complicated, but if we were really who we say we are, who we want to be, the end result would be different.

Driving home to Utah from the Phoenix General Assembly I was stopped at the Arizona border in what was clearly a speed trap.  The state trooper was almost apologetic to this older Anglo woman who maybe looked like his mom.  I got a ticket, but he did not call immigration to see if I could be deported.  I wasn’t shot and killed as so many people of color are during traffic stops. I did not have an Arabic sounding name so I wasn’t a terrorist.  He didn’t ask to search my car looking for weapons or drugs.

I was white, so I was automatically one of the “good people” the “safe people.”  The system of white supremacy took care of me.  Every day of my life I have reaped the benefits of being white.

And every day, I have suffered from it too.  It has kept me separated from other people me so that those moments of sharing across racial lines are as rare as they are precious.  I can’t really be free until everyone else is free too.

This is too long already, so I am going to end by asking you to think some about your own lives and how you learned about and understood racism and white supremacy.  You might want to share those thought with others during coffee hour.

This work will take a lifetime, but it is what will finally save us.   We can all find some of the amazing grace we will sing about in our closing song, one that was written by a man who earned his living as a slave trader. Blessed Be

Whitelash

The genteel become surreal

When white supremacy is named

Clash and slash

It’s a real whitelash

 

Why can’t we white folks

Understand

Its not about us

Our ideas our feelings

 

 

Listen learn

Center on the whole

Swallow defensiveness

And remember to breathe

 

Our advice is not needed

Our opinions are fluff

We can cheer brave folks on

Offer support and yes love

 

This whole world is a mess

But enough is enough

Resistance is reality

Breaking through at long last.