Tag Archive | Valentine’s Day

What’s Love Got to Do with it? UUP 2/12/17

Love is more

Than a valentine

A sunset beach

Or a fancy meal

Love is more than

Than a roaring fire

On a snowy night

Chocolate hearts

Or dreams of sweet delight

Love runs deep

Flows on and on

It lives in all we do

Washing the dishes

Raking the leaves

Tending the children

We sing a song

Hearing our days drift by

Holding hands

We pray that love

Will grow and spread

To wrap the world around

Feeding the hungry

Caring for the sick

Healing the earth

Bringing justice

Raining down

The work of love

Is just what we must do

We talk about love a lot here. Standing on the side of love is one of our slogans.  It is what it says on the stole I am wearing. It is how we describe our national social justice work for immigration, for racial justice and for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender rights.  Love is part of our tradition.  It is the doctrine of our church.  Our Universalist ancestors believed in a loving God, one that would condemn no one to hell, no matter what they believed or did not believe and no matter what they did or did not do.

 

But what is this love we talk about?  That is a complicated question.  Most of you know by now that this congregation is not a place to come if you are looking for easy answers.

We are doing some songs about love today. The one the choir just sang is a fun one. Some of you likely remember the Frank Sinatra song about love being a many splendored thing.  We aren’t doing that one today, but it goes…“It’s the April rose that only grows in the early spring. 
Love is nature’s way of giving a reason to be living.”

The Greeks, who were quite excellent at philosophy, broke love down into four different types: Eros, a passionate and intense love that arouses romantic feelings,

Storge, (store gay) which is family or brotherly love, something you might feel for your children or your very best friend, Phileo, is the affection you feel for the people you like, and last, but not least, there is Agape, (ah gah pee) which is love in the verb form, an unconditional love that requires action.

The Greeks distinguished their forms of love not only by the qualities of the different types of love they were defining, but also about where that love was directed: to a lover, a family member, a friend, or to the world.

 

What they left out was love of self, which is an odd and significant omission I think.  I have no clue as to why, except maybe it was just assumed that people love themselves.  The Greeks were much less guilt ridden and prone to self-esteem issues than are people in our modern culture.

 

It is very difficult to love anyone else if you don’t love and respect yourself.  Could we apply all four of the Greek forms of love to ourselves?  Can we like ourselves as in Phileo?  Other people like us, so it shouldn’t be that hard for us to like ourselves as well.  Can we love ourselves like a close family member?  After all, we know ourselves better than we know anyone else. I also don’t think there is anything wrong with self-love in terms of Eros.  We are all sexual beings; passion is part of our nature as biological beings.

 

And then there is Agape, love as a verb, love as unconditional.  Agape love directed inward is a form of radical self-acceptance.

It drives us toward spiritual health, and moves us to make the changes in our own lives that allow us to focus that Agape love on other people and on the planet.

 

And it is agape love that helps us love our neighbor, and we know that everyone on this planet is our neighbor.  Agape also helps us feel love toward people we don’t like, and even toward our enemies.  Both of those can be difficult, and it is important to remember that it is fine to set boundaries.  Spiritual maturity can even mean that you decide not to be around people whose behavior is harmful to you or others.  You can love them but you can also set limits on your interactions with them.  Communities, and even churches, can also define what is acceptable behavior and what is not.  That can be confusing in a liberal faith such as ours.  We don’t judge people for who they are or who they love, and we say we welcome everyone, but we also don’t want to let pedophiles near our children.  We don’t think it is ok to steal from the offering plate or another member’s wallet.  We don’t think it OK to spread malicious gossip or to demonize other people.

 

Let me repeat that.  It is not OK to demonize other people, even when their actions are really offensive.  It is hard to do that when you are hurting.  It can be hard not to see the other party to a conflict as having purely evil intentions. It is especially difficult when there is a serious power differential, say if someone is president of the United States.  How do we love that person even as they do harm to others we love?

Agape love calls us to see differently, to remember that everyone has pain, and that most of the time, unpleasant or even evil behavior comes from pain.

Abusers have often been abused themselves.  Limits and boundaries are important ways that can help us still feel some love and compassion, even for those who behave very badly.

 

Healing, reconciliation, restoration, is always possible.  The God imagined by the Universalists loved everyone and they believed that everyone would eventually find salvation in that holy love.

 

So what do you think love is?  Do you think it can be divided into categories like the Greeks did?

Some quotes about love:

 

Rita Mae Brown: “Sorrow is how we learn to love. Your heart isn’t breaking. It hurts because it’s getting larger. The larger it gets, the more love it holds.”

 

Marianne Williamson:”Love is what we are born with. Fear is what we learn. The spiritual journey is the unlearning of fear and prejudices and the acceptance of love back in our hearts. Love is the essential reality and our purpose on earth.

 

Lord Byron: “There are four questions of value in life: What is sacred? Of what is the spirit made? What is worth living for and what is worth dying for? The answer to each is the same. Only love.”

 

Everyone, it seems, has something to say about love.

The minister who officiated at my wedding asked both Anne and I what we had learned about love what was then our 39 years together.  This is what I wrote:

 

“What I have learned about love is this:  it doesn’t come easy. It isn’t a happily ever after riding into the sunset with a prince or princess by your side.  Soul mates aren’t magic mirrors reflecting back how you want to see yourself or them.  Reach through the mirror, pay attention to the cracks.  They are how the love – and light gets in.  Leonard Cohen taught me a lot with that line.  You aren’t royalty either, just a frog like other frogs.  Life is the swamp can be lovely though.  It is not necessary to sing every song in tune or dance in time with a perfect rhythm.

Marriage means so much more if you have been engaged for decades.

I know this from experience.  Because engagement is the thing, one of them, that can make a marriage, a partnership work.  Be real and honest and yourself.  Listen carefully.  Pay attention.  Hold your lover’s hand, but don’t hold them back, and try to catch them when they fall.  You will stumble too.  Stay engaged even after you are married.  I think that might be the key.

In any case be grateful.  If someone really loves you, it is a miracle.

Love, like justice, does not come easy, but with enough grace, with enough effort, it comes.  Engagement is the key, in marriage, in justice work, and in congregational life.

 

During our wedding reception, our daughter gave a toast that expressed what she had learned from Anne and I about love.  It really moved me, and I am going to read part of it for you.

“Some of you might know that last summer, I hiked the John Muir Trail. It’s a backcountry trail that runs 218 miles from Yosemite, over 8 mountain passes to Mt. Whitney, all in the backcountry.  This is something I would never have considered if not for the wonderful summers my mothers spent taking the three of us camping in Yosemite, in Yellowstone, in Glacier national parks.

One of the things I was thinking about as I was hiking, was my moms. I had called them from an outpost a week into the hike, and they told me that they had been officially married in California.

It’s good I had my moms to think about because while the trail was beautiful, actually hiking it was also the hardest thing I have ever done.

My backpack was too heavy; it weighed 45 pounds.

I had to clamber up these endless 10-mile inclines, up thousands of feet in elevation, to get to each peak.

And then I had to do it all over again. Those climbs were absolutely horrible.

But then, I’d get to the top.

And the top was unfailingly the most beautiful place I’d ever been, each peak more breathtaking than the last. There were turquoise alpine lakes, wildflowers, and snowcapped peaks, the whole world spread out below your feet.

And I realized, this is what I know about love. And I learned it from my moms. It is hard sometimes. It can be horrible. There are endless switchbacks and sometimes you don’t know if they’ll end, you’re not sure if you’ll make it to the top.

But you keep working at it, you put your head down and put one foot in front of the other and you make it to the top. And at the top is the most beautiful place you’ve ever been.

And then you do it all over again.”

Her words made me cry when I heard them, and they still make me a bit teary-eyed.

All of us here have known hard times over the years. Life is like that.  But even in the midst of pain, we know that life is better because of love.  Love can make life better.

Love can make the world better.  We just have to keep our heads down and put one foot in front of the other.

The road has gotten harder lately, but perhaps we are made for these times, times where we can move and march, sing and dance our way by the light of love, by a fire of commitment that will burn within our hearts.  Keep your flames bright my friends, love will find a way.

 

What’s Love Got to do With it? @theBFUU

standinglove

Love is more

Than a valentine

A sunset beach

Or a fancy meal

Love is more than

Than a roaring fire

On a snowy night

Chocolate hearts

Or dreams of sweet delight

Love runs deep

Flows on and on

It lives in all we do

Washing the dishes

Raking the leaves

Tending the children

We sing a song

Hearing our days drift by

Holding hands

We pray that love

Will grow and spread

To wrap the world around

Feeding the hungry

Caring for the sick

Healing the earth

Bringing justice

Raining down

The work of love

Is what we all must do

We talk about love a lot here. A big banner outside of this hall proclaims that we are standing on the side of love. It is how we describe our national social justice work for immigration, for racial justice and for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender rights. Love is part of our tradition. It is the doctrine of our church. Our Universalist ancestors believed in a loving God, one that would condemn no one to hell, no matter what they believed or did not believe and no matter what they did or did not do.

 

But what is this love we talk about? That is a complicated question. Most of you know by now that this fellowship is not a place to come if you are looking for easy answers.

We are doing some songs about love today. Some of you likely remember the Frank Sinatra song about love being a many splendored thing. We aren’t doing that one today, but it goes…

“It’s the April rose that only grows in the early spring. 
Love is nature’s way of giving a reason to be living.”

The Greeks, who were quite excellent at philosophy, broke love down into four different types: Eros, a passionate and intense love that arouses romantic feelings,

 

Storge, (store gay) which is family or brotherly love, something you might feel for your children or your very best friend, Phileo, is the affection you feel for the people you like, and last, but not least, there is Agape, (ah gah pee) which is love in the verb form, an unconditional love that requires action.

 

The Greeks distinguished their forms of love not only by the qualities of the different types of love they were defining, but also about where that love was directed: to a lover, a family member, a friend, or to the world.

 

What they left out was love of self, which is an odd and significant omission I think. I have no clue as to why, except maybe it was just assumed that people love themselves. The Greeks were much less guilt ridden and prone to self-esteem issues than are people in our modern culture.

 

It is very difficult to love anyone else if you don’t love and respect yourself. Can we apply all four of the Greek forms of love to ourselves? Can we like ourselves as in Phileo? Other people like us, so it shouldn’t be that hard for us to like ourselves as well. Can we love ourselves like a close family member? After all, we know ourselves better than we know anyone else. I also don’t think there is anything wrong with self-love in terms of Eros. We are all sexual beings; passion is part of our nature.

Loving yourself, satisfying yourself sexually, is not a sin.

For me, a sin is something that actually causes harm, not just something that someone says you shouldn’t do.

And then there is Agape, love as a verb, love as unconditional. Agape love directed inward is a form of radical self-acceptance. It drives us toward spiritual health, and moves us to make the changes in our own lives that allow us to focus that Agape love on other people and on the planet.

 

And it is agape love that helps us love our neighbor, and we know that everyone on this planet is our neighbor. Agape also helps us feel love toward people we don’t like, and even toward our enemies. Both of those can be difficult, and it is important to remember that it is fine to set boundaries. Spiritual maturity can even mean that you decide not to be around people whose behavior is harmful to you or others. You can love them but you can also set limits on your interactions with them. Communities, and even churches, can also define what is acceptable behavior and what is not. That can be confusing in a liberal faith such as ours. We don’t judge people for who they are or who they love, and we say we welcome everyone, but we also don’t want to let pedophiles near our children. We don’t think it is ok to steal from the offering plate or another member’s wallet. We don’t think it OK to spread malicious gossip or to demonize other people.

 

Let me repeat that. It is not OK to demonize other people, even when their actions are really offensive. It is hard to do that when you are hurting. It can be hard not to see the other to a conflict as having purely evil intentions.

But love calls us to see that differently, to remember that everyone has pain, and that most of the time, unpleasant or even evil behavior comes from that pain. Abusers have often been abused themselves. Limits and boundaries are important ways that can help us still feel some love and compassion, even for those who behave very badly.

 

Healing, reconciliation, restoration, is always possible. The God imagined by the Universalists loved everyone and they believed that everyone would eventually find salvation in that holy love.

 

So what do you think love is? Do you think it can be divided into categories like the Greeks did?

Some quotes about love:

 

Rita Mae Brown: “Sorrow is how we learn to love. Your heart isn’t breaking. It hurts because it’s getting larger. The larger it gets, the more love it holds.”

 

 

 

 

Marianne Williamson:”Love is what we are born with. Fear is what we learn. The spiritual journey is the unlearning of fear and prejudices and the acceptance of love back in our hearts. Love is the essential reality and our purpose on earth.

 

Lord Byron: “There are four questions of value in life: What is sacred? Of what is the spirit made? What is worth living for and what is worth dying for? The answer to each is the same. Only love.”

 

Everyone, it seems, has something to say about love. The minister who officiated at my wedding asked both Anne and I what we had learned about love what was then our 39 years together. This is what I wrote:

 

“What I have learned about love is this:  it doesn’t come easy. It isn’t a happily ever after riding into the sunset with a prince or princess by your side.  Soul mates aren’t magic mirrors reflecting back how you want to see yourself or them.  Reach through the mirror, pay attention to the cracks.  They are how the love – and light gets in.  Leonard Cohen taught me a lot with that line.  You aren’t royalty either, just a frog like other frogs.  Life is the swamp can be lovely though.  It is not necessary to sing every song in tune or dance in time with a perfect rhythm.

Marriage means so much more if you have been engaged for decades.

I know this from experience.  Because engagement is the thing, one of them, that can make a marriage, a partnership work.  Be real and honest and yourself.  Listen carefully.  Pay attention.  Hold your lover’s hand, but don’t hold them back, and try to catch them when they fall.  You will stumble too.  Stay engaged even after you are married.  I think that might be the key.  In any case be grateful.  If someone really loves you, it is a miracle

Love, like justice, does not come easy, but with enough grace, with enough effort, it comes. Engagement is the key, in marriage, in justice work, and in congregational life.

 

After the wedding reception, our daughter gave a toast that expressed what she had learned from Anne and I about love. It really moved me, and I am going to read part of it for you.

“Some of you might know that last summer, I hiked the John Muir Trail. It’s a backcountry trail that runs 218 miles from Yosemite, over 8 mountain passes to Mt. Whitney, all in the backcountry.  This is something I would never have considered if not for the wonderful summers my mothers spent taking the three of us camping in Yosemite, in Yellowstone, in Glacier national parks.

One of the things I was thinking about as I was hiking, was my moms. I had called them from an outpost a week into the hike, and they told me that they had been officially married in California.

It’s good I had my moms to think about because while the trail was beautiful, actually hiking it was also the hardest thing I have ever done.

My backpack was too heavy; it weighed 45 pounds. I had to clamber up these endless 10-mile inclines, up thousands of feet in elevation, to get to each peak. And then I had to do it all over again. Those climbs were absolutely horrible.

But then, I’d get to the top.

And the top was unfailingly the most beautiful place I’d ever been, each peak more breathtaking than the last. There were turquoise alpine lakes, wildflowers, and snowcapped peaks, the whole world spread out below your feet.

And I realized, this is what I know about love. And I learned it from my moms. It is hard sometimes. It can be horrible. There are endless switchbacks and sometimes you don’t know if they’ll end, you’re not sure if you’ll make it to the top.

 

But you keep working at it, you put your head down and put one foot in front of the other and you make it to the top. And at the top is the most beautiful place you’ve ever been.

And then you do it all over again.

Her words made me cry when I heard them, and they still make me a bit teary-eyed.

All of us here have known many hard times over the years. This congregation has also suffered some hard times. There has been conflict and there has been grief. Life can be like that. But even in the midst of pain, we know that life is better because of love. Love can make life better.

I want to end this sermon with some words paraphrased from 1 John 4.

Let us love one another, because love is from God.

No one has ever seen God, if we love one another, God lives in us.

Those who say “I love God” and hate their brothers and sisters are liars, for those who do not love a brother or sister, whom they have seen, cannot love God, whom they have not seen.

God is love, love is God. It is all we need.

Namaste my friends, Namaste.

Love is More Than a Valentine

march 10_2010

Love is more

Than a valentine

A sunset beach

Or a fancy meal

Love is more than

Than a roaring fire

On a snowy night

Chocolate hearts

Or dreams of sweet delight

Love is just

What we do

Each and every day

We wash the dishes

We rake the leaves

Tend to the children

And watch the days go by

Holding hands and hearts

We pray that love

Will grow and spread

And wrap the world around

Feed the hungry

Care for the sick

Heal the earth

Bring justice

Raining down

For all of this

And so much more

Love finds us work to do