Tag Archive | Unitarian Universalism

Rolling Stones UUP 4/16/17

 

easter stone

What an effort it must have been

To climb down from that cross

So many centuries ago

They thought you were dead forever

It certainly looked like that

You’d prayed your last prayer

Healed your last leper

Driven out your last demon.

They even buried you.

It must have felt so good

To lay your head down

The funeral cloths were soft.

The darkness was comforting

So weary you were

Tired, hurt, bleeding.

You’d seen so much

Suffered so much

Done so much

What harm could it do

To give into rest

For a few days

It must have been hard

To hear the weeping

Of those who had loved you

Of those who had betrayed you

The stone was heavy

But you had to push it aside

Rolling away defeat

Banishing hopelessness

Overcoming fear.

What an effort it must have taken

To come back not knowing

What people would think

How they would respond

Would they think the miracle

Was only about you?

Thank you for letting us know

That we each have the chance

The opportunity, the responsibility

To be reborn

Resurrected.

Again and again.

Like the earth

Each spring

Each morning

Forever and ever

Amen.

 

Happy Easter. There are other holidays at this time of year.  The Jewish Passover celebration is one of liberation, of freedom from slavery. The ritual meal, the Seder, recalls the time the Jewish people spent in Egypt as slaves, and tells the story of their escape to the Promised Land.  That holiday can hold deep meaning for those who do not identify as Jewish.  We weren’t able to hold a Seder this year but next year it should happen.

 

Oester is the pagan celebration of spring and fertility, usually celebrated at the Spring equinox.  It is where we get the name Easter, and it is also where the Easter Bunny comes from. Rabbits don’t normally lay eggs, but the Goddess Oester was in the form of a rabbit, an animal known for its fertility.  She is always portrayed with an egg.  The holiday holds meaning for those who do not identify as pagan.  It is also a particularly fun one for children.

 

Easter is the story of Jesus and his death and resurrection.  A Christian story, it too holds meaning for those who do not identify as Christian.

 

The Easter story is a rich one, an important one, and not an easy one to understand.  It has been the source of hope and renewal for millions.  Millions have fought and died over how it should be understood.

It is good to be celebrating Easter this morning as a Unitarian Universalist!

We can dig into the story, ask some hard questions about it, and – best of all – we do not have to agree on all the answers. No religious wars here.

Easter is most simply a story about a victory of life and love over death.

 

If Easter had not happened, Jesus would have likely been remembered as simply one more in a long line of Hebrew prophets.  Elijah, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Amos, and so many others who called their people back to God, to faithfulness, and back to caring for others, particularly for the poor and oppressed.

 

He was a teacher and a healer, traveling around preaching to ordinary people with a fairly ragtag group of followers.

He made some people mad.  The occupying Romans certainly weren’t happy with him; some of his followers thought he was the messiah, a new king that would free his people and bring Israel back to her glory.

 

The established religious authorities weren’t crazy about him either. He ranted about the money lenders in the temple.  And, just like the pay day lenders of today, I am sure they made a lot of financial contributions to those who had the power.  He healed people and he didn’t charge them for it.  He fed the hungry, also for free.  Yes, he must have made a lot of people mad.

 

So who was Jesus?  Was he a man, a malcontent, a prophet, a lunatic, or a God?  Find your own answer to that question, and cherish the freedom you have to do so.

 

And, who killed Jesus? Was it the Romans or was it the Jews?  Or was his death planned all along by God?  People have died because of the various answers to that question.  Jesus and all of his followers were Jewish, but still Jews have been blamed for his death by many Christians over the centuries and even today.  Would the holocaust have happened without that version of the Easter story?  And if his death was God’s plan, why would the Jews or even Judas be blamed?

 

I say it was the Romans, with the strong encouragement of both the religious and secular authorities of the day.  It was the 1% trying to protect their wealth and power from a movement that frankly scared them.   It is the answer that makes the most sense to me, but you get to decide for yourself what makes sense to you.

 

The idea that it was God’s plan is worth exploring more deeply, however, as it raises an important theological issue.

 

The issue even has a name, “theodicy.” The term comes from the Greek and involves the effort to reconcile the traditional characteristics of God as all good, all loving, and all-powerful with the fact of evil in the world.  In simple terms, the question is why do bad things happen to good people?  If God is running the world, then why does God let those things happen?

I handle that issue for myself by understanding God as a force for good, and not as an all-powerful being.  Others believe that even bad things come from God, as lessons, as tests, or as punishments.

It is an issue worth exploring, and the Easter story is a prime example of how the same event can be interpreted in different ways.

 

Jesus was a good person and a bad thing happened to him.

 

It is clear that Jesus despaired.  He felt that his God had left him, forsaken him.  It is an emotion that I think all of us have felt at one time or another.  Even if we have never believed in God, there are times when most of us have been alone and afraid and have felt that there is no help for us anywhere in the universe.  It is not so very hard to identify with the suffering Jesus.

 

We can also identify with his followers and their grief and fear after his death.  Some of us will never forget when Martin and Malcolm were murdered, when the Kennedy brothers were killed, or when Harvey Milk was slain. Many of us wept bitter tears at those times.  I know I did.

 

But Easter, although an upsetting story in so many ways has a miracle at the end. The stone gets rolled away and Jesus comes back to life – or at least his spirit and his message lived on.

 

Easter can also lead us to reflect on what is blocking our own pathway to a more abundant life.

What is the stone that seals us into a metaphorical tomb?  Is it an addiction that has made our life unmanageable?

Is it a relationship that isn’t working, a job that is so tedious that it exhausts you for anything else, an earlier trauma that just won’t heal? Did someone else put that stone in your path? Is it racism, sexism, homophobia, or your social class? What is holding you back from being who you were meant to be?

 

Can you, do you have the courage and strength to begin to roll that stone away all by yourself?  Most of us need some help, because those stones are very heavy and are hard to get rolling.  It is also scary, as it can be comfortable in a tomb, safe and protected from further harm.

 

The resurrection of Jesus can be interpreted as a metaphor, and some see it as a fact.  In either case, what does it mean?  Does it signify hope for all of us?  Did his death save us?  Who do we mean by us?  What do we mean by salvation?

 

Very early in Christianity, there was a lot of argument about this.  OK, there is still a lot of argument about this.

The earliest Universalists, prior to the 4th century even, were divided over some of these issues, but they were in agreement that if the death of Jesus provided salvation, it was salvation for everybody by the grace and goodness of God.  No exclusions.

No restricting salvation to just Christians; it is universal.  Not everyone agreed then and not everyone agrees now.

There is a New Testament verse that is often quoted that deals with some of this.  John 3:16

“For God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.”

 

The conservative interpretation of this text has caused a lot of grief.  It freaked me out when I was younger.  “God loves us, he sacrificed his son, believe this or you will die.”  The book of John is the most mystical of the Gospels, and taking it at all literally doesn’t make any sense to me, and it also doesn’t really do it justice.

Are humans so evil that such a sacrifice would be required?  The verse itself says God gave his son out of love.  Perhaps it was a simple gift, and not a sacrifice.

Maybe the message from God was instead, “Here is this man in whom I have invested my spirit, listen to what he says, believe him, follow him, and life will come to you.”

The Easter story should be one of pure joy, of pure relief.  There was suffering and there was death, but out of it came new life and new hope.  Jesus reappeared after only three days.  The tomb was empty.  He came back to life.  His followers saw him in ordinary people and in each other.

 

Can we listen to this story of hope? Can we find out how to get our own heavy stones rolled away so we can find our way back to life?  Can we learn to do justice and love mercy?  Can we love our neighbor as ourselves? Can we see every human being as both our parent and our child?  How long will it take us?  Are three days enough?  Three years?  Three decades? Three thousand years?

 

Those questions are for each of you to answer, each in your own way.  But as Unitarian Universalists we are called to life, to be born and reborn again and again.

 

You can live with your questions, cherish your doubts, and believe what you must, but don’t let anything keep you shut inside a cold tomb of despair, afraid of trying new things, afraid of trying. Come back to Life instead, rejoice in the springtime, and savor the good that you find around you.

 

Come back to hope and commitment; come back to searching for a better way; roll those heavy stones away.  Blessed Be. Happy Easter.

Boundless

My rage flows boundless

From the molten core of my heart.

 

How long

Will this go on?

How much

Can one soul take?

 

Ancient as the earth

The pain of war

Relentless as the wind

The chains that hold us all.

 

The sea overflows with our grief

For lost hopes

While the ashes of our dreams

Wash up on distant shores.

 

My rage flows boundless

The fire rises in my throat

Boundless yes

But silent?

Not.an.option

Anymore

 

Let the lava flow

Let it melt the walls

Release will ease our hearts

And quiet our fears

 

When the fires cool

Will there be a new land

Children safe at last

We are the ancestors

May we find the courage

To earn the future’s gratitude.

 

 

 

 

 

Morning Light

There is a special quality of light

As a new day dawns

The shadows are still deep

Danger can lurk undisclosed

 

But every budding leaf

Of each new tree is also revealed

Dew sparkles like shattered glass –

Or chains

 

Seize the day

Open eyes can

Bring about the dawn

There is nothing more beautiful

Than justice reborn.

 

 

 

 

 

Your Money and Your Life UUP 4/2/17

Money-Bag

 

Draw the circle wide, that is what our faith is about isn’t it?  We try to welcome all to the circle of this congregation and this faith.  We try to pay attention to those who have been marginalized and we attempt to truly celebrate diversity in all of its manifestations.

 

Just saying something doesn’t make it so, however.  It will take all of us, working together, to live the words from that song and to live the words of our mission statement: Live your sacred, transform through love, act with courage.

 

It will also take money, your money.  We are beginning our annual stewardship campaign, and during this campaign you will be asked to make a financial pledge in support of this congregation and its mission.

 

This year’s theme, created by the stewardship committee with some input from the board is:

 

“Coming Together–Expanding Community–Changing the World!”

 

There are also three specific goals:

–Affirm Our Commitment to Professional Ministry
–Expand Our Religious Education Programs for Children, Youth, and Adults
–Expand Our Leadership for Social and Environmental Justice

 

You will be hearing a lot more about the goals and how they fit into the theme over the next month or so, but today I want to talk about money.

 

Money can’t buy you love, as the song goes, but what is the meaning of money in your life?  How important is it?

 

Say you are walking down a dark alley late at night, and you hear a voice saying, “This is a stick up, give me your money or give me your life.”

 

Some of us may have heard those words and been faced with that actual decision, but for most of us, that stark choice is only something to think about – or maybe worry about.  But the choice is pretty clear; almost all of us would choose life in that situation.   You can’t take it with you, as the saying goes.

 

This isn’t a dark alley.  This is springtime in Petaluma. But I’m going to ask you that same question, “Your money or your life?”

 

A lot of us have lost money over the years and some of us have lost a great deal.  Some of us have never had much money to begin with. There are those that have lost jobs, and those that have lost their homes.  Financial loss or uncertainty can bring an increased tendency to hoard, or at least to be more cautious with our spending.  Some of that is a good thing.

Frankly, almost all of us, even those of us with fairly limited incomes, have gotten into some bad habits over years. Buying more than we need and always getting something new rather than repairing something old.

It hasn’t been good for our pocketbooks, and has been terrible for the environment.   The trash thrown out every day in a typical American household could feed and clothe a whole village for a month in many parts for the world.

 

But when money is tight, we feel insecure.  We are afraid of losing more.  We tend to hold on tighter.

This congregation, like all congregations has experienced financial worry, deferring decisions that might make a difference in how much you can do, both internally and in relationship to the wider world.

 

We need to be careful not to hold on too tight to what money we have, however.  If we confuse our net worth with our inherent worth, we can find we have lost not only money, but also our life.

 

It is actually pretty easy to lose both, your money and your life.  Maybe not easy in the sense that we will literally die if we lose all of our money. That can happen if someone ends up on the street, without food or shelter.  If there isn’t money for medicine or health care, that too can be life threatening.

 

But the real danger, for most of us, is to have hard economic times change us in ways that cause our spirits to die.

 

If we let fear take over, then we can lose all the joy, all the possibilities, all the opportunities for generosity that can still be very much a part of our daily lives.  We can become so cautious that we are always saving for some future rainy day despite the fact that it is already pouring outside and the roof is leaking buckets.  We can let opportunities slip by us because we are convinced things will only get worse.

 

Loss is a funny thing.  It is never fun, but it can also make us appreciate what we have, can help us get our values clarified, and our priorities more in line with who we want to be in the world.  People who have faced a life-threatening illness know this very well.  I have never heard someone on their deathbed say that they wish they had spent more time with their money.  And although some may wish they had more money to leave to their loved ones when they die, most know that it is the love they leave behind that has the most value.

 

Instead, many people who have suffered serious illness come to a realization about what is really important in life.  They treasure more of the moments, they enjoy the sunshine more deeply, and even, sometimes bad weather.

Some, who have lost a loved one to death, also come to take better care of their remaining relationships.

 

Life is indeed short, no matter what we do or don’t do.  A line from one of our hymns says:

“For all life is a gift, which we are called to use to build the common good and make our own days glad.”

 

Make our own days glad.  Now, you have all heard the saying that money can’t buy you happiness.  Money can’t buy you love.  A certain amount is necessary of course.  Survival needs: clothing, shelter, food. Some money for some comfort items beyond the basics helps.  It is nice to be able to go to a movie, eat out once in a while, or take a trip.  But how much money do we really need?

I found this poem by Kurt Vonnegut, most famous for his book, Slaughterhouse Five.  He wrote it after his friend, and fellow author, Joseph Heller died.   Heller wrote Catch 22.  Those of you who didn’t read the books may have seen the movies.

The poem:

Joe Heller

True story, Word of Honor:
Joseph Heller, an important and funny writer
now dead,
and I were at a party given by a billionaire
on Shelter island.

I said, “Joe, how does it make you feel
to know that our host only yesterday
may have made more money
than your novel ‘Catch-22′
has earned in its entire history?”
And Joe said, “I’ve got something he can never have.”
And I said, “What on earth could that be, Joe?”
And Joe said, “The knowledge that I’ve got enough.”
Not bad! Rest in peace!

“The knowledge that I’ve got enough,” we really need to stop awhile and think about what that is, what it means.  The larger consumer culture is always telling us that we don’t have enough, that we need a bigger house, a newer car, the latest fashion, and the most sophisticated electronic device that doesn’t even exist yet.

 

The question, “what is enough?” has been a pretty personal one for me.  As some of you know, I worked for the Social Security Administration for 25 years.  It was a very secure job, and one that paid a fairly good salary.  I could have kept working there another five years and would have received not only the additional salary, but also a much larger pension.

 

My “net worth” would have been much higher than it is today if I had done that.  But I was tired of working there; it wasn’t much of a challenge anymore even though I still loved the work in many ways.  The early retirement pension that was offered seemed like it was enough to get by on.

 

Instead of just staying on the job, I spend four years in seminary and am now been a minister. It is not a decision that I think I will ever regret.

 

Life, my life and your life, is about much more than money.  What makes you feel more alive and what gives your life its purpose and meaning?

I suspect it is not really the size of your bank account, or even of your shrinking stock portfolio, if you were lucky enough to ever have either one of those.

 

Money does have value, but I would maintain that the true value of money lies in how you spend it, not in how much you earn or in how much you have saved.  I had to pay quite a bit of tuition for seminary, but what I learned there and the calling I have found as a result is priceless, way beyond the actual dollar value that could have paid for a very expensive and fancy car.

 

The money I have given to the various good causes I have supported over the years is also worth much more to me than anything I have ever spent on furniture, for instance.  Furniture is nice, nice furniture is even nicer I suppose, but expensive furniture doesn’t have the kind of value that is really important.

 

That gets to some of the questions I am trying to ask today.  Are you spending what money you have on something of real value, either for yourself or for someone else?

 

As I said, you will be getting a lot more information about the stewardship campaign, including an invitation to share some food and talk about what this congregation means to you and what level of financial commitment you are both willing and able to meet.

I want to ask you all of you to consider pledging at the “sustainer level.  It will be in the chart you will receive later, but note that the amount varies by how much income you have.  If your income is around $10,000 per year, you can consider yourself a sustainer of this congregation for $250 a year.  If your income is $100,000 a year, it will cost you $5,000 to say the same thing.

 

The stewardship campaign will be going on all month. Spend some of that time reflecting on how much this community means to you and how much you are willing and even eager to commit to ensuring that it thrives.

 

Is it a matter of your money or your life?  Some churches make promises of a penthouse suite in the celestial kingdom if you pledge generously to their church.

 

I don’t believe what you give to a church will make a difference to you after you die.  But what it just might do is help save your life now, today.

 

True generosity always comes back to the giver. Giving might save your life, give it more meaning.

 

It also might save someone else’s life.

 

Put it all on a scale in your mind’s eye.  Your money or your life, your money or someone else’s life, how do they balance out?  I am not asking anyone to give more than they can or should.  If you are struggling now to meet your basic needs, a token amount is just fine.

But think about what you spend your money on, and what is really valuable in the long run.  Most of us have enough money, much more than we usually realize.  What we don’t have enough of is love, community, and justice.

 

Pat Francis will speak later about how this congregation saved her life.  She isn’t the only one here who has that story to tell.  There are also a lot of other people who need what we have to offer.  Can we draw our circle wide enough to include them?

 

Blessed Be.

 

Why Religious Community? UUP 3/19/17

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The words church and God in the reading may have made some of you uncomfortable. Listen to your discomfort. It can be a good thing.  In the story I told the children, I imagine the person who was asked the question about the purpose of the church was more than a little uncomfortable.

 

So why are we here?  Why are you here?  Why does the Unitarian Universalists of Petaluma even exist?  History could be referred to of course; there were reasons this congregation was formed.  We could ask some of the founding members what they were trying to do, what they dreamed, but that isn’t the whole answer.  Congregations are living things, and they change over time as the members change.  New people add something, others leave and we lose their continued contributions, although something of their spirits always remains.  The individual members change as well.  Our founders are not the same people they were when they formed this congregation. Life brings change to the world, to individuals, and to congregations.

 

Think back, if you will, about what you were looking for when you first attended this church.  How has that changed over time, and how have you changed?

 

I love questions. I think most Unitarian Universalists love questions.  One could even say that asking questions is a part of our free faith.

We don’t have creeds, but instead we have guidelines for ethical behavior, which is what our seven principles are about. This is not a faith tradition where everyone can do whatever they might feel like doing, whenever they feel like doing it. It is an accepting tradition; we do acknowledge our imperfection. We aspire to high ideals and know we will still sometimes fail, sometimes dismally.  That is OK, but the demanding part of our faith is that we keep trying.  We have goals and visions of the world we would like to create.  It isn’t an easy task.

 

We have a mission statement here. It says what we are supposed to be doing here together, on Sundays and throughout the week.

 

The mission statement is on the banner behind me.  “Live your sacred, transform with love, act with courage.”

 

It is a pretty great statement, I think. Do you all like it too?

 

But what does it mean?  Sacred means a lot of different things to people, which is why it says “your sacred” not “the sacred.”

 

Ralph Waldo Emerson said,

“A person will worship something – have no doubt about that. We may think our tribute is paid in secret in the dark recesses of our hearts – but it will out.

That which dominated our imaginations and our thoughts will determine our lives and character. Therefore, it behooves us to be careful what we worship, for what we are worshipping, we are becoming.”

 

Some people worship money or success.  Some are dominated by a quest for power.  Some worship beauty or truth, the quest for knowledge, or simple happiness and joy.

 

Some people come to services on Sundays to learn how to be a better person.  Is that true for you? It matters how we live our lives and how we treat each other.  Character also includes other things like integrity and responsibility, practicing compassion and forgiveness, being open minded, curious, inspired to make a positive difference with our lives, both for the people we are close to and for the wider community and world.  Learning to transform through love is part of that.

 

Some people come to enrich their own spirits, to feel whole and to experience joy and sorrow in ways that are real.  A religious community needs to provide comfort to those that are hurting.  Has this community ever done that for you when you were having a hard time?

 

Unitarian Universalism is not a “sit back and enjoy your own spiritual understanding.”  We aren’t navel gazers.  No, we are called to serve, and spiritual growth is what fuels our social action.  We can learn to love the whole world, including ourselves – and we can learn to “act with courage.”

But why do you come here?  Why do we need a congregation like this one here in this town?  Why do we need a religion like Unitarian Universalism in the world?

 

Think for a minute about why you came here this morning. Not why you came in the past, but why you came today. You are here after all, so you must have a reason for coming.

 

What are some of them?  Go ahead and shout them out.  I know some of you are not shy.

 

Robin Bartlett, a Unitarian Universalist Religious educator, in her blog post from which our reading was taken, has heard a lot of people say they come to church for their children, because the children are asking questions about God, or because a neighbor or friend is trying to recruit them into a more conservative religion.

 

Some people say they come to church because the sermons are entertaining.  The crazy preacher can be really funny; you never know just what she will say.  You could find much better entertainment, however, on TV, in the movies.

Maybe you come for the music, but you can find great music a lot of places, at concerts, festivals, and on I-tunes.

 

Some people say they come for the intellectual stimulation, to hear words and ideas that make them think. Of course, you could attend a college level lecture for that. There are a lot of other places you can go to stimulate your brain cells.

 

Maybe you come because you care about social justice.  This community works very hard in many ways to bring more justice, equity, and compassion into our world.

But if social justice action is your only reason, there are literally thousands of other groups you could join that are doing fabulous work for a wide variety of social causes.

 

If you are looking for inspiration here, for motivation, for ideas on how to live in this complex world, you could read poetry, listen to TED talks, or join a self-help group.

If you are hurting and looking for comfort or if you are trying to find yourself, you could go into therapy.

 

Some people come to church to make friends, or even to find a life partner.  You could also do that at a bar, a health club, a bowling league, or through social media.

 

Some people also come to church to find God, the holy, to connect with their inherent spirituality.  There are also other ways to do that.  Go out in nature, watch a sunset, plant flowers, or play with your children. You will surely find the holy there.

 

Did I cover everything?

 

I did forget one, which reminds me of a joke.

 

It’s Sunday morning and the alarm goes off.  A woman turns over in bed and groans.  She turns to her partner and moans.  I don’t want to go to church today.  I know the sermon is going to be boring.

People will ask me to do things I don’t have time for.   I’d rather just stay home and sleep in today.  Her partner turns to her with a sigh.

Honey, you have to go to church today.  “Why? Why do I have to go to church?”

The answer?  “Honey, you have to go to church because you are the minister.”

 

There are many reasons to come to church, but unless you are the minister, there are many other options.  Even ministers can decide on a different career choice.  Almost none of us are do it for the money in any case.

But how many places can you go where all of those reasons can apply?

 

Robin Bartlett tells us to go to church

“for community, for learning, for solidarity, for a good word, for love, for hope, for comfort, even for salvation. Go to church because you can’t imagine not going. Go to church because (of what) your church …demands of you. Go to church because you cry in the worship service at least once a month. Go to church because you look forward to seeing the people.

Go to church because your church forces you to put your money where your mouth is–to use your financial resources to make a statement about what has worth. Go to church because you are known here. Go to church because you want to be known. Go to church because you pray for this same imperfect, rag-tag group of people all week until you meet again. Go to church because you need to in order to get through your week.

Go to church because if you miss a week, you feel like something was really missing in your life. Go to church because your church community helps you to go deeper; to risk transformation; to yank you further down a path–to ultimate reality, to truth, to God–kicking and screaming. Go to church because it is a statement to yourself and your children about what has value and meaning. Go to church to find your purpose and live it. Give yourself the gift of church.” http://uuacreligiouseducation.wordpress.com/2014/02/11/dont-go-to-church-for-your-children/

 

She goes on to say, specifically addressing parents who say they come to church for their children,

“If church is not a gift for you, it won’t be a gift for your children.

You know that old (line) that we borrow from (the) plane instructions we hear read by flight attendants–… apply your own oxygen mask first before you apply your child’s, right? Well, you are your child’s religious educator and oxygen mask. Not our (religious exploration) curricula. Not our volunteer teachers. Not (the) minister. You. That’s a big responsibility, and (maybe) you don’t feel up to the task because (few) of us do.

But if we aren’t getting our spiritual needs met–our religious yearnings satiated; our deepest cries in the night soothed; our need to serve and be served; our God-sized hole occasionally filled, emptied and then filled up again– then we are never going to be up to the task of helping our children do the same.”

She says, “Don’t go to church for your children; go to church for you. You deserve it. Your children deserve it. And this brutal and beautiful world needs you to.”

That last line is worth repeating, “This brutal and beautiful world needs you to.”  How important is this congregation, how important is Unitarian Universalism, not just to those of us who gather here each Sunday, but also to others in our town, in our state, in our country, in our world.  I think we offer a vital service by thriving as a faith.  We offer hope to the young person wondering if their life is worth living because they are gay, to the man just released from prison expecting to be shunned by everyone he meets, to the recovering alcoholic, to the person who is homeless, to the eccentric thinker who everyone else thinks is just crazy, to the members of conservative religions who worry that their questions are somehow sinful, and to all the people who are suffering in so many ways from a culture that is far from accepting of differences and difficulties. Even if they never find their way here, even if they never sit in this room with us, if they know about us, we have given them some hope.  We have made a difference.  We have offered an alternative, a radical alternative, a community based on love.

So if you have been thinking this morning about the reasons you come here, I assume you have thought of more than a few.

I have another question for you.

How much would it cost if you went other places to get what you find here at this church?  How much more would you be spending on tuition, on therapy, on concert and movie tickets, or on drinks in a bar, if you did not come to church?

What about the things that are truly priceless?  How could you possibly meet anywhere else the diverse and wonderful people we have here in this religious community?  Where else would you be welcomed with such open and loving arms no matter who you are and how you are feeling?    Where else are tears and laughter both not only acceptable, but treated as precious?

Our theology is about life, about continual new beginnings, second, third and fourth chances.  It is a life-saving, life enhancing theology.

This congregation is at a point of transition and there are some decisions to make about your future. There will be plenty of time to explore the options, but as you do so please keep in mind not only why you are here, but why others might be here, and why this faith is so needed in our world. Amen, As-salāmu alaykum, and Namaste.

Islam and Unitarian Universalism @UUP 2/26/1

peace_be_upon_you_fb

 

Asalom aleikum

Greeting means peace and blessings upon you in Arabic. Good morning!

Today, I am going to talk about Islam, but you need to know that I am far from an expert on the Muslim faith.  I took two classes on Islam while in seminary. I have had a few Muslim friends and colleagues and have participated in Muslim prayer and Sufi chanting. This gave me the gift of a glimpse into a different faith, a glimpse that moved me and filled me with wonder.  I hope to share some of that wonder with you today.

There are somewhere around 1 billion Muslims worldwide and as many as 8 million in the United States.  Islam is the fastest growing religion in the world. The rate of growth of Islam in the United States is also very high.   40- 60% of American Muslims have African-American heritage.

 

Those two statements make some people nervous.  Racism and Islamophobia can be a powerful combination if fear is what you are looking to inspire. This fear is actively encouraged by our current national leadership, but even among liberals, there is a certain almost dumbfounded lack of comprehension, a confusion even, about why anyone would freely chose a religion that is perceived as monolithic, extreme, and oppressive.

 

I had some of that same confusion myself before I had the privilege of working with and studying with actual Muslims.  The media portrayal of Muslims tends to focus on the extremes.  Women certainly were oppressed in Afghanistan under the Taliban.  The so called Islamic state is frightening, but those are the extremists among Muslims, just like the Westboro Baptist Church promotes an extreme interpretation of Christianity.

 

It was interesting to learn that Islam, when it first began, brought many new rights to women, including education.   Gay and lesbian people are still oppressed in much of the Islamic world, but it was interesting for me to learn that while the Qu’ran has the same old Sodom and Gomorrah story that Christians have misinterpreted for centuries, those ugly Leviticus verses are not repeated in the Qu’ran.  It is important to not judge any religion by its extremists.  The term “Progressive Muslim” is not an oxymoron.

 

First, a little history.

Remember learning about Christopher Columbus and his brave voyage?  I do. Columbus and the Pinta, the Nina and the Santa Maria, he discovered America, right?  Later I learned, as you probably did, about the Norse explorer, Leif Erickson.  Still later, there was a little bit of discussion about how the American continents weren’t exactly empty when Columbus and Erickson came.  I learned tidbits about the complex civilizations and cultures that flourished in this hemisphere prior to the invasion of the Europeans.

What I didn’t learn about until I took a class is that there were African Muslims who traded with the peoples of the Caribbean and Central America for hundreds of years before Columbus.  It is well documented, just not well known.

 

It was not a coincidence that Columbus sailed from Spain, a country that had been under Islamic rule for 700 years.  Trade and travel throughout the Muslim world was common in those times and Africa was a center for Islamic study.  One would guess that Columbus was actually pretty darn sure what he would find by sailing west, since so many African Muslims had already made similar voyages.

 

Then there were the horrors of the Atlantic slave trade.  Estimates vary, but approximately 30-40% of the people captured and transported to the Americas as slaves were practicing Muslims.

 

Quite a number were literate and could read and write in Arabic and recite large portions of the Qur’an from memory.

One of the more famous Muslim slaves was Job Ben Solomon who was able to win his freedom and return to Africa in 1734.  He was highly literate and knew the Qu’ran by heart.

 

This history shows that Islam was part of the religious landscape of America from the very beginning.

 

Many of you may have heard of the five pillars of Islam.

The first pillar is Shahadah, or witness.  It is an affirmation.  La ilaha il Allah – Muhammadun Rasul l’Allah: There is no God but God and Mohammad is the prophet of God.  Muslims are decidedly NOT Trinitarians.

They believe that Jesus was an important prophet, but not the literal son of God.  Sounds a lot like the original Unitarian theology doesn’t it? We could also do a bit better on witness, sharing with others what we love about our faith.

 

The second pillar is Salat, or prayer.  A devout Muslim prays 5 times a day in praise of and in gratitude to God. There is an old joke that most Unitarian Universalists are very opposed to prayer in schools and a few are not terribly fond of it in their churches either.  Still, even for a devout atheist, it is hard not to be impressed.  To spend several minutes, 5 times a day, every day, focusing on gratitude and on something larger than yourself is a pretty awesome spiritual practice.

 

The third pillar is Zakat, or alms.  Once a year, a Muslim is supposed to give 2 ½ % of his or her assets, or capital – not just income, capital – to the poor.  Talk about a culture of generosity!  In the Qur’an the giving of alms is associated with worship since faith in God is expressed by good deeds.  Deeds not creeds.  That sounds pretty familiar too, doesn’t it?

Our stewardship drive is coming up soon, so start tallying up your assets so you can calculate the 2 1/2 percent.  If you prefer, you can follow the Christian practice of 10% of your income. Or maybe the UU practice of 5% to the church and 5% to other causes.

 

The fourth pillar is Sawm or fasting, which is done worldwide in the month of Ramadan.

Muslims fast from sunrise to sunset in remembrance of when the first verses of the Qur’an were revealed.  Like the daily prayers, this is a very personal and intense focusing on God.  It involves sacrificing for your faith.

 

The fifth pillar is the Hajj, or Pilgrimage. Muslims from all over the world gather in Mecca during the last month of the Islamic year.  It is the largest annual assembly of people in the world and dates back to the days of Abraham.  It is a profoundly religious experience.

 

It is interesting that four out of the five pillars of Islam involve a spiritual practice or discipline.  It is a religion of doing and being much more than it is a set of particular theological beliefs.  This is even truer for the Sufi tradition within Islam which focuses on a mystical relationship with the divine.

 

Let’s look now at some of the traditional theology of Islam as contrasted with traditional Christian theology. There is some overlap of course.  Islam is part of the Abrahamic tradition along with Christianity and Judaism.  Followers of those three faiths are often called People of the Book.

I also stress the word traditional because there is a lot of diversity among Muslims just as there is among Christians and Jews – and of course, Unitarian Universalists.

 

First, there is no concept of original sin in Islam.   People are born essentially good and not deserving of punishment.

How similar to our Unitarian Universalist principle about the inherent worth and dignity of all!  The original sin concept has been used to keep the downtrodden in their place, from the peasants in the middle ages to the slaves in the Americas.  If the theology is such that people are evil then why bother to treat them humanely on earth?

 

Human suffering is, in fact, a very bad thing, and Muslims are called to work to end it.  They are not asked to “turn the other cheek” and to suffer oppression and injustice as the cross that God has somehow sent to them to bear.

I quote from Malcolm X:

 

There is nothing in our book, the Koran, that teaches us to suffer peacefully. Our religion teaches us to be intelligent. Be peaceful, be courteous, obey the law, respect everyone; but if someone puts his hand on you, send him to the cemetery. That’s a good religion.

Let me be clear, however, Islam is NOT a religion that glorifies aggressive violence.

The Qur’an is very specific in saying that violence is only justified as a defensive measure, and that it should be used at the minimal level required for that defense.

 

Most Christian imagery has pictured Jesus with white skin and God as an old white man with a beard. Muslims do not make images of God at all and God is described as containing all genders.

 

All genders and all races included.  From the beginning, Islam was racially integrated.  The Qur’an says quite explicitly:

Among other signs of His is the creation of the heavens and the earth, and the variety of your tongues and complexions. Surely there are signs in this for those who understand. All those who are in the heavens and the earth are His.

 

There is also an important historical connection between Islam and Unitarian Universalism.

Back in the 15th century, the Unitarians in Transylvania were vulnerable during the religious wars in Europe and so they formed a partnership with the Islamic Sultan Suleiman of the Ottoman Empire. They were brought together by their shared conception of God as one. Turkish soldiers protected the only Unitarian King in history, and supported his claim to the throne.  At one point the Sultan sent a gift of 1000 Turkish prayer rugs that were hung in Unitarian churches throughout Transylvania.

 

The connection in Transylvania is an important and powerful one.  It was a significant part of how our tradition survived in that part of the world.

So we can celebrate, in gratitude, our history with Islam.

 

I am not going to stand here and pretend I like everything about the Muslim faith. I don’t like everything about any faith other than my own.

That is why I am a Unitarian Universalist. And as a Unitarian Universalist, I try to learn what I can learn from other religions.

 

Islam got it right, from the very beginning, about racism.  The Qur’an has never been used to justify racial discrimination like the Bible has.

 

And Islam also got it right about religious freedom.  A quote on this from the Qur’an,

Let there be no compulsion in religion: Truth stands out clear from Error: whoever rejects evil and believes in Allah hath grasped the most trustworthy hand-hold, that never breaks.”

Unitarian Universalists can certainly celebrate “no compulsion in religion” as it is very close to our own “free and responsible search for truth and meaning.”

As we are gathered today, in this religious community, we know how much it means to us to have found this space.  Our religion is one of practice too.  How we live in the world, with each other, with the whole of creation is what is most important to us.  For many of us, finding Unitarian Universalism has been a coming home, a sanctuary from a sometimes not very life affirming world.  Our principles guide us and hold us to the hope of making the world a better place, building a world community with peace, justice, and liberty for all.

 

 

For many people of color in particular, discovering Islam has been a similar coming home:  a sanctuary from a racist society, a religion that affirms the humanity of all races, one that is filled with hope for a better world.

Justice, equity, and compassion in human relations, a free and responsible search for truth and meaning.    How can we not celebrate these principles of ours wherever they might be found?

 

Wheel of Justice

I wrote this back in May of 2006, during the Bush years.  Little did I know I would need it again.

Wheel of Justice

The wheel is rolling backward.

Listen to the voices shouting,

In anger and in rage.

The soft sobs at the end of the day

Echo through the valley of despair.

The city streets are baking,

The countryside is gray with dust.

There is a heartbeat Somewhere.

Feel it pulsing.

A small sprout of green

Rises up through the cracked pavement

A sparrow drops a seed.

If we cannot stand it

Then we have to stand.

 

If we cannot stand

Then we have to crawl.

Don’t wipe the tears.

Let them run

Through the fields,

Water for the crops

That we must grow.

The wheel is rolling backwards

But that doesn’t have to be.

First one

Then another

Yet another

And again

We will feel the good ache

Of holy muscles

Working with us,

As we place

Our shoulders to the wheel

 

What’s Love Got to Do with it? UUP 2/12/17

Love is more

Than a valentine

A sunset beach

Or a fancy meal

Love is more than

Than a roaring fire

On a snowy night

Chocolate hearts

Or dreams of sweet delight

Love runs deep

Flows on and on

It lives in all we do

Washing the dishes

Raking the leaves

Tending the children

We sing a song

Hearing our days drift by

Holding hands

We pray that love

Will grow and spread

To wrap the world around

Feeding the hungry

Caring for the sick

Healing the earth

Bringing justice

Raining down

The work of love

Is just what we must do

We talk about love a lot here. Standing on the side of love is one of our slogans.  It is what it says on the stole I am wearing. It is how we describe our national social justice work for immigration, for racial justice and for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender rights.  Love is part of our tradition.  It is the doctrine of our church.  Our Universalist ancestors believed in a loving God, one that would condemn no one to hell, no matter what they believed or did not believe and no matter what they did or did not do.

 

But what is this love we talk about?  That is a complicated question.  Most of you know by now that this congregation is not a place to come if you are looking for easy answers.

We are doing some songs about love today. The one the choir just sang is a fun one. Some of you likely remember the Frank Sinatra song about love being a many splendored thing.  We aren’t doing that one today, but it goes…“It’s the April rose that only grows in the early spring. 
Love is nature’s way of giving a reason to be living.”

The Greeks, who were quite excellent at philosophy, broke love down into four different types: Eros, a passionate and intense love that arouses romantic feelings,

Storge, (store gay) which is family or brotherly love, something you might feel for your children or your very best friend, Phileo, is the affection you feel for the people you like, and last, but not least, there is Agape, (ah gah pee) which is love in the verb form, an unconditional love that requires action.

The Greeks distinguished their forms of love not only by the qualities of the different types of love they were defining, but also about where that love was directed: to a lover, a family member, a friend, or to the world.

 

What they left out was love of self, which is an odd and significant omission I think.  I have no clue as to why, except maybe it was just assumed that people love themselves.  The Greeks were much less guilt ridden and prone to self-esteem issues than are people in our modern culture.

 

It is very difficult to love anyone else if you don’t love and respect yourself.  Could we apply all four of the Greek forms of love to ourselves?  Can we like ourselves as in Phileo?  Other people like us, so it shouldn’t be that hard for us to like ourselves as well.  Can we love ourselves like a close family member?  After all, we know ourselves better than we know anyone else. I also don’t think there is anything wrong with self-love in terms of Eros.  We are all sexual beings; passion is part of our nature as biological beings.

 

And then there is Agape, love as a verb, love as unconditional.  Agape love directed inward is a form of radical self-acceptance.

It drives us toward spiritual health, and moves us to make the changes in our own lives that allow us to focus that Agape love on other people and on the planet.

 

And it is agape love that helps us love our neighbor, and we know that everyone on this planet is our neighbor.  Agape also helps us feel love toward people we don’t like, and even toward our enemies.  Both of those can be difficult, and it is important to remember that it is fine to set boundaries.  Spiritual maturity can even mean that you decide not to be around people whose behavior is harmful to you or others.  You can love them but you can also set limits on your interactions with them.  Communities, and even churches, can also define what is acceptable behavior and what is not.  That can be confusing in a liberal faith such as ours.  We don’t judge people for who they are or who they love, and we say we welcome everyone, but we also don’t want to let pedophiles near our children.  We don’t think it is ok to steal from the offering plate or another member’s wallet.  We don’t think it OK to spread malicious gossip or to demonize other people.

 

Let me repeat that.  It is not OK to demonize other people, even when their actions are really offensive.  It is hard to do that when you are hurting.  It can be hard not to see the other party to a conflict as having purely evil intentions. It is especially difficult when there is a serious power differential, say if someone is president of the United States.  How do we love that person even as they do harm to others we love?

Agape love calls us to see differently, to remember that everyone has pain, and that most of the time, unpleasant or even evil behavior comes from pain.

Abusers have often been abused themselves.  Limits and boundaries are important ways that can help us still feel some love and compassion, even for those who behave very badly.

 

Healing, reconciliation, restoration, is always possible.  The God imagined by the Universalists loved everyone and they believed that everyone would eventually find salvation in that holy love.

 

So what do you think love is?  Do you think it can be divided into categories like the Greeks did?

Some quotes about love:

 

Rita Mae Brown: “Sorrow is how we learn to love. Your heart isn’t breaking. It hurts because it’s getting larger. The larger it gets, the more love it holds.”

 

Marianne Williamson:”Love is what we are born with. Fear is what we learn. The spiritual journey is the unlearning of fear and prejudices and the acceptance of love back in our hearts. Love is the essential reality and our purpose on earth.

 

Lord Byron: “There are four questions of value in life: What is sacred? Of what is the spirit made? What is worth living for and what is worth dying for? The answer to each is the same. Only love.”

 

Everyone, it seems, has something to say about love.

The minister who officiated at my wedding asked both Anne and I what we had learned about love what was then our 39 years together.  This is what I wrote:

 

“What I have learned about love is this:  it doesn’t come easy. It isn’t a happily ever after riding into the sunset with a prince or princess by your side.  Soul mates aren’t magic mirrors reflecting back how you want to see yourself or them.  Reach through the mirror, pay attention to the cracks.  They are how the love – and light gets in.  Leonard Cohen taught me a lot with that line.  You aren’t royalty either, just a frog like other frogs.  Life is the swamp can be lovely though.  It is not necessary to sing every song in tune or dance in time with a perfect rhythm.

Marriage means so much more if you have been engaged for decades.

I know this from experience.  Because engagement is the thing, one of them, that can make a marriage, a partnership work.  Be real and honest and yourself.  Listen carefully.  Pay attention.  Hold your lover’s hand, but don’t hold them back, and try to catch them when they fall.  You will stumble too.  Stay engaged even after you are married.  I think that might be the key.

In any case be grateful.  If someone really loves you, it is a miracle.

Love, like justice, does not come easy, but with enough grace, with enough effort, it comes.  Engagement is the key, in marriage, in justice work, and in congregational life.

 

During our wedding reception, our daughter gave a toast that expressed what she had learned from Anne and I about love.  It really moved me, and I am going to read part of it for you.

“Some of you might know that last summer, I hiked the John Muir Trail. It’s a backcountry trail that runs 218 miles from Yosemite, over 8 mountain passes to Mt. Whitney, all in the backcountry.  This is something I would never have considered if not for the wonderful summers my mothers spent taking the three of us camping in Yosemite, in Yellowstone, in Glacier national parks.

One of the things I was thinking about as I was hiking, was my moms. I had called them from an outpost a week into the hike, and they told me that they had been officially married in California.

It’s good I had my moms to think about because while the trail was beautiful, actually hiking it was also the hardest thing I have ever done.

My backpack was too heavy; it weighed 45 pounds.

I had to clamber up these endless 10-mile inclines, up thousands of feet in elevation, to get to each peak.

And then I had to do it all over again. Those climbs were absolutely horrible.

But then, I’d get to the top.

And the top was unfailingly the most beautiful place I’d ever been, each peak more breathtaking than the last. There were turquoise alpine lakes, wildflowers, and snowcapped peaks, the whole world spread out below your feet.

And I realized, this is what I know about love. And I learned it from my moms. It is hard sometimes. It can be horrible. There are endless switchbacks and sometimes you don’t know if they’ll end, you’re not sure if you’ll make it to the top.

But you keep working at it, you put your head down and put one foot in front of the other and you make it to the top. And at the top is the most beautiful place you’ve ever been.

And then you do it all over again.”

Her words made me cry when I heard them, and they still make me a bit teary-eyed.

All of us here have known hard times over the years. Life is like that.  But even in the midst of pain, we know that life is better because of love.  Love can make life better.

Love can make the world better.  We just have to keep our heads down and put one foot in front of the other.

The road has gotten harder lately, but perhaps we are made for these times, times where we can move and march, sing and dance our way by the light of love, by a fire of commitment that will burn within our hearts.  Keep your flames bright my friends, love will find a way.

 

Sources of our Faith 1/29/17

Most of us are pretty familiar with the seven principles of Unitarian Universalism.  If you are not, they are listed in the front of your hymnal.

Our principles are guides for living, an ethical framework for how we are called to live our lives.  They are what our member congregations have promised to promote.  We care about the worth and dignity of all, about justice, equity and compassion, about spiritual growth, a free and responsible search for truth and meaning, the democratic process, creating an inclusive and world-wide community, and last, but never least, we have respect for our planet.  All of those things are under threat today, which is why so many of us marched or attended rallies last week.

But why do we care about those things that are in our seven principles?  What do we use in our searches for truth and meaning?  How and why do we work for justice?

The answers to those questions are, I believe, contained within our six sources. The sources are also listed in your hymnals.  They quite literally define Unitarian Universalism’s unique place in the world of ideas and world religions.  I quote, “The living tradition we share draws from many sources.”

Living is a key word here, as well as is the word tradition.  Our sources are from our history; they are where we came from.  But even more importantly, they are what we can use to find out where we are going.

Sometimes our sources are listed simply as a series of nouns:

  • Self (or Experience)
  • Prophets (or Prophecy)
  • World religions
  • Judaism/Christianity
  • Humanism
  • Paganism

The Rev. Paul Oakley has said that the verbs are more important; that the sources are also asking us to do things, specifically to:

Renew our spirits and be open

Confront evil with justice, compassion, love

Be inspired in our ethical and spiritual lives

Love our neighbors as ourselves

Be guided by reason and avoid making idols of ways of thinking, being, and doing

Celebrate life and live in harmony with nature

Oakley says our sources are not just history, but “the wellsprings from which we irrigate our vineyards, the cups from which we wet our parched mouths.”

These sources are incredibly rich, every single one of them.

I want to encourage all of you to look at them and think about them, long terms members as well as the new folks we welcomed today. Some of the sources may have little personal meaning for you at this time.  That used to be true for me.  But if you pay a little more attention to those sources that haven’t moved you in the past, I think you may be surprised at what you will discover.  It is a living tradition after all.  We need to give it ways and room to grow.  The sources are the wells from which we can draw spiritual water.  Sometimes one of the wells goes a little dry. A reservoir can be emptied or the groundwater from a particular well that has been over used may no longer quench our thirst. Check out one of the others when this happens.

 

The first source is:

Direct experience of that transcending mystery and wonder, affirmed in all cultures, which moves us to a renewal of the spirit and an openness to the forces which create and uphold life;

 

What does that mean?  Several things I think.  Revelation is not sealed.  We are not a faith that believes that all religious truth was written down in ancient scriptures. Mystery and wonder are all around us.  We need to trust our own experiences and our own senses.  If we see a rainbow and think it is a miracle, maybe it is.

 

Many of us have had, in our own lives experiences which some would name spiritual.

 

There have been times where a deep realization of an important truth has left us in awe and wonder.

It is a knowing that not everything can be understood by the simply rational. It is a sense that there really are forces that both create and uphold life, even if they are forces that are beyond our understanding.  This direct experience could be a sense of having a personal connection to God, but it doesn’t have to be exclusively theistic.  One of my former congregants who defines himself as a humanist tells a story about the feeling he had when he visited the Smithsonian in Washington DC. He had a moment there when he realized that everything in that fabulous museum actually belonged to him.  He was part of something much larger than himself.  We should never discount our own experience of the world around us.  This source reminds us to think, see, and feel for ourselves.  It doesn’t mean we will always be right, but we don’t have to buy into someone else’s version of reality and we can affirm what is true for us.

 

 

The second source is:

Words and deeds of prophetic women and men which challenge us to confront powers and structures of evil with justice, compassion, and the transforming power of love;

 

Who are your heroes?  Who has inspired you?  It could be someone famous, but it could just be someone you know.  Many members of this church community have inspired you both with their words and deeds.

 

There are awesome role models here, both in service to the congregation and in working for justice. This source also leads us to look at our heroes and who they were as well as what they did.

 

Did they confront evil not only to bring about justice, but did they do so with compassion and love?  No one is perfect, but those who would lead us to hate others are not those we should try to model ourselves after.

 

The third source: Wisdom from the world’s religions which inspires us in our ethical and spiritual life;

 

It was the transcendentalists, people like Ralph Waldo Emerson and Margaret Fuller, that studied world religions, especially those that valued direct experience of the divine, that brought this source into the mainstream of Unitarianism in the 19th century.  They dipped deeply into this well, and so can we.

 

What do the religions of the world have to teach us?  What spiritual practices from other traditions can give our lives more meaning?

 

Yoga, Buddhist meditation practice, the Hindu concept of Namaste, and the daily prayers of Islam, are only a few places we can go for help in our spiritual and ethical lives.  This source is a place awaiting our discoveries.  Most of us have not looked too closely at what the different world religions have to offer us. It is important to understand context, however.

If we simply cherry pick, we don’t do this source justice and may even be drawn into cultural appropriation.

 

 

The fourth source is: Jewish and Christian teachings which call us to respond to God’s love by loving our neighbors as ourselves;

 

This source is our immediate history and heritage.  Both Unitarianism, the belief that God is one, and Universalism, the belief that God loves all of creation and that there is no hell; have their roots in very early Christianity, which of course in its beginning was a Jewish movement.

 

This history can speak very strongly to those of us who attended exclusively Christian Churches or Jewish Congregations in the past.  Some of us loved the many inspiring messages contained in both the Jewish and Christian scriptures.  Others of us fell victim to rigid and literal interpretations of those scriptures.  It can help to revisit some of them with fresh eyes and open hearts

 

Our fifth source is: Humanist teachings which counsel us to heed the guidance of reason and the results of science, and warn us against idolatries of the mind and spirit;

 

This is the source that I think most helps to keep us honest.  Whatever we believe and do must make some sense in the real and rational world.

 

Yes, we can have understandings of mystery that are beyond the realm of the scientific method, but it is dangerous ground to rely on something that is in direct contradiction to what reason and science tell us.  Angels might fly, but we humans are subject to gravity.

The Bible might say one thing, but if science tells us the world is much older than 6000 years, I am going with science.  Science and religion are not in conflict.

They should both be about increasing our understanding of the universe and our place in it.

 

That brings us to our sixth source, the last official one, which is: Spiritual teachings of earth-centered traditions which celebrate the sacred circle of life and instruct us to live in harmony with the rhythms of nature

 

How can we not live in harmony with nature when we are part of it?   This is the favorite source for many of us who have come to Unitarian Universalism from pagan traditions and practices.  There are seasons to our lives just as there are seasons in the year.  The need for harmony with nature is also in the Jewish and Christian Scriptures as well as in the various world religions.  Sometimes we just need to go up on a mountain and watch the sunrise.

 

Those are our six official sources, places where we can go for inspiration and for solace.  Is anything left out?

What would you add to this list?  It is not written in stone, we can add things to it, just as we can rewrite the seven principles.  There is a democratic process to do that at our national assemblies.

The sixth source was added to the original five in 1995.  There was also a proposal to revise the wording of the sources a couple of years ago. It did not pass, but it could have.

 

What would you add?

One I might add would be something about the arts, including music, poetry, and dance as well as the visual arts.  Beauty, meaning, and inspiration can come from artistic creativity.

 

Paul Oakley said that, “We irrigate the fields not by worshiping the water but by doing something with the water.”

 

He is not wrong, but we also need to go back and drink from the wells that spiritual water comes from, again and again.  Living is thirsty work.

 

We can’t afford to ignore any of these spiritual wells just because we might like the flavor of one of them a bit more.

 

We are an open minded and open hearted people.  Our sources are rich and life sustaining.  May we drink deeply and be satisfied.

 

 

Shattered Glass

The glass has shattered

But the ceiling holds

Rose colored spectacles

Are rimmed with blood

But still we can see

The sun shining

Beyond the poisoned skies

 

Hold my hand

My dear my love

Put on your boots

Protect your feet

As we move forward

Into a world

Of broken glass

To rebuild again

And again

And again