Tag Archive | Transgender Day of Remembrance

Welcome Table -UUP 11/19/2017

Would you harbor me?  Would I harbor you?  The song we just heard by the choir asks important questions.  Would you offer a safe harbor to just about anyone who needed it?  What does it mean to harbor someone? Do we always have to say yes when someone is seeking sanctuary?  Is everyone really welcome at the table of this congregation?  Do we want to open our doors really wide? What would that mean?  How would it change us?

 

These are practical questions, but they are also spiritual ones. The practical ones are difficult enough, but the spiritual can be even harder.

Today is Transgender Remembrance Day.  As was explained in the reading, it is a day when we are asked to remember those who have been murdered in the last year because of their real or perceived gender identity.  We are going to do that now.  It is important.

 

2017 has already seen at least 25 transgender people fatally shot or killed by other violent means just in the United states. The world-wide total is much larger.  Most are people of color.

I will now read the names of a few of those precious souls. Please hold them in tender care, knowing that each name represents at least hundreds and probably thousands of others.

  • Mesha Caldwell, 41,a black transgender woman from Canton, Mississippi, was found shot to death the evening of January 4.
  • Sean Hake,23, a transgender man in Sharon, Pennsylvania, died after he was shot by police responding to a 911 call from his mother.
  • Jamie Lee Wounded Arrow, 28,an American Indian woman who identified as transgender and two-spirit, was found dead in her apartment in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.
  • JoJo Striker, 23,a transgender woman, was found killed in Toledo, Ohio, on February 8.
  • Tiara Richmond, also known as Keke Collier,24, a transgender woman of color, was fatally shot in Chicago on the morning of February 21.
  • Chyna Gibson, 31,a Black transgender woman, was shot and killed in New Orleans on February 25.
  • Ciara McElveen, 26,a transgender woman of color, was stabbed to death in New Orleans on February 27.
  • Jaquarrius Holland, 18,was shot to death in Monroe, Louisiana, on February 19.
  • Alphonza Watson,38, was shot and killed in Baltimore, Maryland, on March 22.
  • Chay Reed,28, a transgender woman of color, was shot and killed on April 21 in Miami.
  • Kenneth Bostick, 59, was found with severe injuries on a Manhattan sidewalk, he later died of his injuries.
  • Sherrell Faulkner, 46,a transgender woman of color died on May 16, of injuries sustained during an attack on November 30, 2016 in Charlotte, North Carolina.
  • Kenne McFadden, 27, was found in the San Antonio River on April 9. Police believe she was pushed into the river, which runs through downtown San Antonio.
  • Kendra Marie Adams, 28,was found in a building that was under construction and had burns on her body on June 13.
  • Ava Le’Ray Barrin, 17,was shot and killed in Athens, Georgia on June 25 during an altercation in an apartment parking lot.
  • Ebony Morgan, 28, was shot multiple times in Lynchburg, Virginia, in the early morning of July 2.
  • TeeTee Dangerfield, 32,a Black transgender woman, was shot and killed on July 31 in Atlanta, Georgia.
  • Gwynevere River Song,26, was shot and killed in Waxahachie, Texas, on August 12.
  • KiwiHerring30, was killed during an altercation with police on August 22 during an altercation with her neighbor.
  • Kashmire Nazier Redd, 28,was fatally stabbed by his partner on September 5.
  • Derricka Banner, 26, was found shot to death in Charlotte, North Carolina on September 12.
  • Scout Schultz, 21, was shot and killed by Georgia Tech campus police on September 16.
  • Ally Steinfeld, 17,was stabbed to death in Missouri in early September.
  • Stephanie Montez, 47, was brutally murdered near Robstown, Texas.
  • Candace Towns, 30,a transgender woman who was found shot to death in Georgia.

May their spirits rest in love and in peace.   Let us hold their memory in a brief time of silence.

…………………….

Why did these individuals and so many others like them die such violent deaths?   Did no one harbor them?  Could no one, even those that loved them, provide enough protection?

 

One of the ugliest aspects of human social behavior is the tendency we sometimes have to treat people who are different in cruel and often violent ways.

 

I am not sure why that is, really.  Maybe it is fear.  People who are different can challenge our own identities, our sense of security, and our ideas about the way the world works.  We like to divide the world into binaries: male and female, black and white, religious and secular, theist and atheist, us and them, and right and wrong.

 

People who identify as transgender challenge that simplistic and dualistic way of looking at the world simply by living their authentic lives.  The world is more than black and white.  There are all the colors of the rainbow in nature, and gender expression can be just as diverse.  In many indigenous cultures, people who cross traditional gender boundaries are honored as being two-spirited and often are given roles of religious leadership.

 

In cultures with more rigid gender roles, in cultures where crossing the gender line can threaten the patriarchal power structure, such people are instead disparaged and abused.  Ours is a patriarchal culture.

 

 

 

Things were slowly beginning to change for the better, but we are now in the midst of a serious backlash. Transgender people were attacked early with the president wanting to ban them from serving in the armed forces, but so many people with marginalized identities of all types are at increased risk by not only the current administration, but by the forces of hate, bigotry, and division that have always been with us, but have been given new life and energy.  Nazis are marching in the streets of our cities, shouting the vile slogans of racism and anti-Semitism.

 

Will the candles we light be brighter than their torches?  Will our love be enough to save us?

 

How can we live with the despair we feel when we faced with so many tragedies, day after day, after day? Our hearts are weary with listening to the long lists of those lost; we weep over the names and faces of the victims of violence and hate.  So much is painful these days.  How can we stand to live in a world with such horrifying and rampant gun violence, with the frightening impact of climate change which has made the storms and fires so much worse, or with the deep knowledge that sexual assault is woven into the fabric of our culture when virtually every woman alive is crying out, me too, me too?

 

Can we find a safe harbor for ourselves? Can we provide one for others?

 

What does it mean to harbor someone?  Is it just giving physical shelter or is it more?  I think it is a lot more.  It is the spiritual promise we make when we affirm our first principle: to affirm and promote the inherent worth and dignity of every person.

 

Harboring is welcoming, really welcoming with open arms, hearts, and open doors.  We say it often on Sunday mornings, when we welcome everyone with a whole laundry list of just who that welcome includes.  Repeating that list is important because when some churches say “we welcome everybody” they only sort of mean it.

They welcome everybody who is willing to accept by faith the beliefs of that particular religion.  Some even ask people to change who they are.  We try to practice a more radical kind of welcome here.  Yes, we have some rules. You can’t smoke during the service.  If you go around screaming at other people, we will ask you to be quiet or leave.  We expect people to be kind and respectful of other people.  But smoking and screaming and being unkind to others are behaviors, and behaviors can be changed, and we are all works in progress.  Part of the mission of a religious community is to help us learn to be our best selves.

 

Churches are sanctuaries, spiritual sanctuaries, but also legal ones.  The state is not supposed to interfere with what happens in churches.  That is part of the first amendment.  I love the first amendment.

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.”

 

The first amendment is in trouble now.  The free press is being dismissed as fake news, facts are optional, the truth is whatever serves the purpose of those with the power.  1984 has come and gone and is back again.

 

Offering sanctuary, harboring someone is always risky business.

Some of our states have passed laws that make it a crime to even give a ride to someone who is an undocumented immigrant.  Need a ride home from church?  Show me your green card.

The Unitarian Minister, Theodore Parker, is said to have written his sermons with a pistol beside him because he had fugitive slaves hidden in his cellar.

In Nazi Germany, if you harbored a Jew, you could be sent to a concentration camp where you could be tortured and killed.

Would you harbor me if you put your own life at risk to do so?

Not an easy question to answer, but it is one we should all be thinking about.

 

Even if we don’t risk death or imprisonment, really harboring someone is still risky business.  What would happen to this community is we took the risk to create the kind of congregation that truly welcomed all?  What would happen if we decentered the white middle-class culture that permeates almost all that we do here?  What would happen if we actually welcomed Christians with the same warmth and care that we offer to those who have been hurt by Christianity?

 

I do believe there is hope, it is part of my faith to believe in hope.  I have to keep singing, singing for all of the precious lives who need a sanctuary, who need a place to renew their spirits, a place to get the energy to go out and keep working for positive change.  This community can be that kind of place, an open inclusive space, where different cultures, beliefs, and ways of being are respected, honored and celebrated.  We are almost there, you have been working on it and do so much well.  It will never be perfect, because nothing is ever perfect. But the stretching, the experimenting, the trying, the continual opening and reopening of our hearts and minds to a wider vision of a welcome table, that effort will help us create a beloved community that will be a true sanctuary for all who are seeking one.

 

Hold me, harbor me, I will hold you, I will harbor you.

 

 

Say it to yourself, say it to each other.

 

Hold me, harbor me.  I will hold you, I will harbor you.

 

Now say it now to someone you don’t know, someone who isn’t here, someone maybe that you may never meet.  Say it to all the hurting searching souls.

 

Hold me, harbor me.  I will hold you, I will harbor you.

 

Blessed be.

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The Gender Games @theBFUU 2/01/15

transparent_transgender_symbol

How many of you have seen or read, “The Hunger Games”? Quite a few of you have, I see. I haven’t read the book yet, and probably won’t go to see any of the movies. I get a large enough dose of violence just reading about world events.   Watching violence on the big screen just freaks me out.

But from what I have learned from reading about it, the hunger games are very deadly.

So, unfortunately, are many of the gender games we play.

It is much more than just stunting the potential of more than half of our population. We do that when we limit the possibilities and career paths open to girls. We are still guiding them mostly toward the caregiving roles. We are also stunting the emotional growth and the career possibilities for our boys, trapping them in the stereotypes of what it means to be a man.

 

That is deadly enough because it means that we are killing people’s spirits by not allowing them to flourish into their own individuality, with their own unique gifts.   It is a huge loss for the person and a huge loss for the world.

 

The rules of the gender games are enforced primarily by social pressure. If someone really breaks the rules, however, the penalty can be not only violence, but too often it is death.

 

When Malaya Yousafzai broke the rules in her native land of Pakistan by trying to get an education, an attempt was made on her life. That young girl’s courage and persistence should inspire us all.

 

How much would you risk to get an education? How much would you risk to be what your culture tells you is not only impossible but wrong?

 

Every year, on November 20th a day is set aside internationally to remember those who have been killed in the last year because of their gender identity. Transgender Remembrance Day reminds us that Pakistan is not the only country where the penalty for breaking gender rules is violence and death.

 

For many years, I have held either an evening service on that day, or addressed the issue during a Sunday Service. We missed it this year here at the fellowship; there were just too many other things going on at the same time.

 

Part of the format of a Transgender Day of Remembrance service is to read the list of names of those people who have been killed in the last year. It is always a partial list. It also includes only those who have been murdered, not those who took their own lives.

 

I want to lift up the story of one young person who died by suicide on December 28 of this year.

 

Leelah Alcorn was born Joshua Ryan Alcorn on November 15, 1997

Alcorn was raised in a conservative Christian household in Ohio. At age 14, she came out as trans to her parents, Carla and Doug Alcorn, who refused to accept her gender identity. When she was 16, they denied her request to undergo transition treatment, instead sending her to Christian conversion therapy with the intention of convincing her to reject her gender identity and accept her gender as assigned at birth. After she revealed her attraction toward males to her classmates, her parents removed her from school and revoked her access to social media. In her suicide note, Alcorn cited loneliness and alienation as key reasons for her decision to end her life and blamed her parents for causing these feelings. She committed suicide by walking out in front of oncoming traffic on the Interstate 71 highway.

Alcorn arranged for her suicide note to be posted online several hours after her death, and it soon attracted international attention across mainstream and social media. (info on Leelah Alcorn from wikipedia)

 

Dominic wrote an original song about Leelah, which he will sing during the offering.

 

Leelah was a victim of our static gender roles no less so that those who have been murdered by direct violence. She broke the rules by not living within the cultural norms of how women and men should be.

 

Those norms are maintained by violence, and people who appear to be transgender bare the brunt of that violence.

As horrible as these crimes are, it is important to understand that that they are not isolated aberrations. They are not simply crimes committed by warped individuals. They are part of the gender system. It is hard to call it a game because it is so deadly, but they are only the most obvious means of social control and punishment for when you break the gender rules.

 

You know this. How many of the men here have been called a sissy when you were young simply because you dared to shed a tear or two? How many of you were beaten up or called a faggot because you were lousy at sports?

 

Girls are called dykes if they are too assertive. If they are brave, they are told they have balls.

 

It is crazy. It is mean. It does damage to people’s souls and their sense of wholeness and worth.

 

It is where a lot of homophobia comes from I think. If gay people have all the rights, privileges, and responsibilities that heterosexuals do, then what will we threaten our children with if they want to do something that is out of the norm for their gender?

 

Telling a child that they “must be gay,” loses all of its negative punch if it is no big deal to be gay.

 

There may be some natural differences between the genders. Anne and I have three children. One of our sons is an accountant and the other is a chemist.

Our daughter has been a special education teacher and she is now working for an educational non-profit. They all seem well suited as individuals for what they are doing, even though they have chosen careers that match the stereotypical gender roles in our culture.

 

Our children should be able to choose the lives they want for themselves, but we have to make sure that they are real choices, not just the results of the limitations imposed upon them because of their gender.   We always told our kids that they could choose to be and do whatever they wanted. There was no guarantee of success, but ours was definitely a family that did not have specific gender roles that they felt compelled to follow.

 

Which is why the legalization and acceptance of same gender marriage really is a threat to traditional marriage. It isn’t a threat to heterosexual marriage at all, but it does directly challenge traditional gender roles. Guess what, though, all you straight couples who try and equalize the power dynamics within your relationships, you too are a threat to traditional marriage.

 

Congratulations! It is work well worth doing for your daughters and for your sons.

But let me go back to the issue of violence for a minute. The violence against people who are transgender is the most extreme example of punishment for breaking the gender rules. Anti-gay violence is another.

 

We also have sexual violence, usually used against women and girls, but sometimes against men as well. Some have referred to it as a culture of rape. Women and even young girls are sexualized to the extent that their bodies are seen as primarily objects of sexual desire. Fashion and popular culture play into it. Girls are cautioned not to go out at night unless they are in a large group or have a male escort. The risk of assault and rape is high, so it is understandable that parents offer this advice. The fear of rape limits the choices of women. It too is a form of social control based on violence or the threat of violence. The killings in Santa Barbara last year were only an extreme example of why women (#yesallwomen) too often live in fear.

 

Let me share some statistics:

 

Average number of rape cases reported in the US annually 89,000

Percent of women who experienced an attempted or completed rape 16%

Percent of men who experienced an attempted or completed rape 3%

Percent of victims raped by a friend or acquaintance 38%

Percent raped by a stranger 26%

And perhaps the scariest statistic of all:

Percent of rapes that are never reported to authorities 60%

 

That is a truly horrifying number. All the numbers are disturbing because violence is disturbing, but why are so few rapes reported?

If someone is robbed or their home is burglarized, it is almost always going to be reported to the police. People are not afraid of admitting that their wallet was stolen. They know that no one will say it was their own fault.   No one will consider them “damaged goods.”

 

So we have the violence of rape, coupled with the social stigma that, in some circles at least, becomes attached to the victim. No wonder young women are afraid to go out alone at night. No wonder some boys learn that they don’t have to take no for an answer.

 

But some young women do go out at night. Some, like Malaya dare to learn what girls are not supposed to learn. Some young men learn that no means no and that the freely given love and respect of an equal is so much sweeter than anything they can demand or try to force.

 

The gender games don’t have to be so violent. We all really can be just who we are, respected and treasured. We need to recognize the courage of those who dare to live authentic lives. I am so proud of and grateful for the openly transgender people who are a part of this community.

They are heroes who refuse to play the gender game by someone else’s rules.

 

In my sermon blurb describing this service, I said there were theological issues about this topic.

You will discover, if you haven’t already, that I think there are always theological issues. Defining God as male is a problem. It is also not an accident that the religious institutions that refuse to ordain women are also the most homophobic and trans-phobic. If you need examples, think of the Southern Baptists, the Missouri Synod Lutherans, the LDS church and the Catholic Church. Think of all but the most liberal of the many Muslim groups. The rules of the gender game were written by these conservative faiths so unlike our own.

 

Our Universalist ancestors believed God loved everyone, no exceptions. Our Unitarian ancestors believed that every human being had the potential within them to be divine.

Namaste. Namaste.

 

Holly Near wrote a song that has the words:

 

“Something changes in me when I witness someone’s courage. Something changes in me anytime there’s someone standing. For the right to be completely all the good things that we are

 

Do not forget the children, they are singers in the storm

And when their hearts are threatened, well a fire is bound to start. It wakes us up at midnight, we feel an ancient pain

And I do believe that loves directs the flame”

May we let love direct our own flames. May we let its bright light shine upon the gender games and help us know we can play by healthier and happier rules. Blessed Be

Gender Games

To watch a video of the sermon click (here)

Call to Worship (click)

How many of you have seen or read, “The Hunger Games”?  Quite a few of you have, I see.  I haven’t read the book yet, and probably won’t go to see the movie.  I get a large enough dose of violence just reading about world events.   Watching violence on the big screen just freaks me out.

But from what I have learned from reading about it, the hunger games are very deadly.

So, unfortunately, are many of the gender games we play.

It is much more than just stunting the potential of more than half of our population.  We do that when we limit the possibilities and career paths open to girls.  We are still guiding them mostly toward the caregiving roles. We are also stunting the emotional growth and the career possibilities for our boys, trapping them in the stereotypes of what it means to be a man.

That is deadly enough because it means that we are killing people’s spirits by not allowing them to flourish into their own individuality, with their own unique gifts.   It is a huge loss for the person and a huge loss for the world.

The rules of the gender games are enforced primarily by social pressure.  If someone really breaks the rules, however, the penalty can be not only violence, but too often it is death.

When Malaya Yousafzai broke the rules in her native land of Pakistan by trying to get an education, an attempt was made on her life.  That young girl’s courage and persistence should inspire us all.

How much would you risk to get an education?  How much would you risk to be what your culture tells you is not only impossible but wrong?

This coming Wednesday, November 20th is Transgender Remembrance Day.  It is a day set aside internationally to remember those who have been killed in the last year because of their gender identity.  Pakistan is not the only country where the penalty for breaking gender rules is violence and death.

Some years, we have held an evening service on that day, but the attendance was always sparse.   Part of the format of that service is to read the list of names of those people who have been killed in the last year.  It is always a partial list.  We know there are many more who have died, but reading the names of those we know about can help us remember that they were all someone’s child and that someone loved them.  I will now read their names, their ages if known, and their city and state or country where they were killed.

Natália Sotero (age:20)
 Brazil

Rafael da Silva Tavares (age:21)
 Brazil

Valeria (age:30)
 Brazil

Joales dos Santos (age:22)
 Brazil

Wagner Paula Rodrigues (age:42)
 Brazil

Otávio Nascimento Valadares (age: 20)
 Brazil

Ronald Feitosa Souza (age:26)
 Brazil

Fábio da Conceição Machado (age: 26)
 Brazil

Jorge Luciano Soares De Oliveira (age: 38)
 Brazil

Rosa Fernando Domingues (age:36)

Joelma
  Brazil

Mônica Lewinski (age:38)
 Brazil

Nicole Galisteu (age:20)
 Brazil

Stephanie (age:33)
 Brazil

Dalvalei José Alves Pereira (age:37)
 Brazil

Camila
 Brazil

Fernanda Queiroz
 Brazil

Angel Francisco Martinez Gonzalez
 Mexico

Ashley Sinclair
 Orlando, Florida

Kelly Young
 Baltimore, Maryland

Palmira Garcia (age:37)
 Venezuela

Gaye
 Istanbul, Turkey

Naomi Estrada (age:19)
 Mexico

Karen
 Mexico.

Tiffany” Wesley Holder (age 19)
 Guyana

Adán Amilcar Iglesias (age 20)
 Honduras

Daniel Mendoza Ricardo Macias (age:23Mexico

Domonique Newburn (age:31)
 Fontana, California

Islan Nettles (age:21)
 New York City, New York

Dwayne Jones  (age 16)
 Jamaica

Cemia “CeCe” Dove (age:23)
 Cleveland, Ohio

Renato Espinosa Reyes (age:23)
 Mexico

Yeison Ramirez Acosta (age:22)
 Colombia

Eyricka Morgan  (age:26)
 New Brunswick, New Jersey

Mylene (age:42)
 France

Evon Young (age:22)
 Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Artegus Konyale Madden (age:37)
 Savannah, Texas

Dora Oezer (age:24)
 Turkey

Natascha (age:27)
 Brazil

Brunete Nascimento Chagas (age:22)
 Brazil

Hilary Molina Mendiola
 Mexico

S. Athiswaran (age:31)
 Malaysia

Gunce Hatun
 Turkey

Diamond Williams (age:31)
 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Terry Golston
 Shreveport,Louisiana

Jock Maurice McKinney (aka Valarie)
 Shreveport,Louisiana

Dicky Othman
 Malaysia

Fatima Woods (age:53)
 Malaysia

Melony Smith (age:28)
 Baldwin Park, California

I wish that list was much shorter even while I know that in reality it is much longer.  Some countries, such as Brazil, are just better at reporting these deaths.  If we knew all the names it would take us more than a full day to read them.

These people were victims of our static gender roles.  They broke the rules by not living within the cultural norms of how women and men should be.

Those norms are maintained by violence, and people who appear to be transgender bare the brunt of that violence.

Just the other week, an 18-year-old high school student named Sasha was riding a city bus in Oakland, California and fell asleep.  Sasha was wearing a skirt, but appeared to be male.  A sixteen year old set fire to the skirt.  Sasha is still hospitalized with severe burns.

As horrible as these crimes are, it is important to understand that that they are not isolated aberrations.  They are not simply crimes committed by warped individuals.  They are part of the gender system.  It is hard to call it a game because it is so deadly, but they are only the most obvious means of social control and for punishment when you break the rules.

You know this.  How many of the men here have been called a sissy when you were young simply because you dared to shed a tear or two?  How many of you were beaten up or called a faggot because you were lousy at sports?

Girls are called dykes if they are too assertive.  If they are brave, they are told they have balls.

It is crazy.  It is mean.  It does damage to people’s souls and their sense of wholeness and worth.

It is where a lot of homophobia comes from I think.  If gay people have all the rights, privileges, and responsibilities that heterosexuals do, then what will we threaten our children with if they want to do something that is out of the norm for their gender?

Telling a child that they “must be gay,” loses all of its negative punch if it is no big deal to be gay.

There may be some natural differences between the genders.  Anne and I have three children.  One of our sons is an accountant and the other is a chemist.  Our daughter has been a special education teacher and she is now working for an educational non-profit.  They all seem well suited as individuals for what they are doing, even though they have chosen careers that match the stereotypical gender roles in our culture.

There aren’t any wrong choices for our children, but we do have to make sure that they are real choices, not just the results of the limitations imposed upon them because of their gender.   We always told our kids that they could choose to be and do whatever they wanted.  There was no guarantee of success, but ours was definitely a family that did not have specific gender roles that they felt compelled to follow.

Which is why the legalization and acceptance of same gender marriage really is a threat to traditional marriage.  It isn’t a threat to heterosexual marriage at all, but it does directly challenge traditional gender roles.  Guess what, though, all you straight couples that try and equalize the power dynamics within your relationships, you too are a threat to traditional marriage.

Congratulations!  It is work well worth doing for your daughters and for your sons.

But let me go back to the issue of violence for a minute.  The violence against people who are transgender is the most extreme example of punishment for breaking the gender rules.  Anti-gay violence is another.

We also have sexual violence, usually used against women and girls, but sometimes against men as well.  Some have referred to it as a culture of rape.  Women and even young girls are sexualized to the extent that their bodies are seen as primarily objects of sexual desire. Fashion and popular culture play into it.  Girls are cautioned not to go out at night unless they are in a large group or have a male escort.  The risk of assault and rape is high, so it is understandable that parents offer this advice.  The fear of rape limits the choices of women.  It too is a form of social control based on violence or the threat of violence.

Let me share some statistics:

Average number of rape cases reported in the US annually 89,000

Percent of women who experienced an attempted or completed rape 16%

Percent of men who experienced an attempted or completed rape 3%

Percent of victims raped by a friend or acquaintance 38%

Percent raped by a stranger 26%

And perhaps the scariest statistic of all:

Percent of rapes that are never reported to authorities 60%

That is a truly horrifying number. All the numbers are disturbing because violence is disturbing, but why are so few rapes reported?  If someone is robbed or their home is burglarized, it is almost always going to be reported to the police.  People are not afraid of admitting that their wallet was stolen.  They know that no one will say it was their own fault.   No one will consider them “damaged goods.”

So we have the violence of rape, coupled with the social stigma that, in some circles at least, becomes attached to the victim.  No wonder young women are afraid to go out alone at night.  No wonder some boys learn that they don’t have to take no for an answer.

But some young women do go out at night.  Some, like Malaya dare to learn what girls are not supposed to learn.  Some young men learn that no means no and that the freely given love and respect of an equal is so much sweeter than anything they can demand or try to force.

The gender games don’t have to be so violent.  We all really can be just who we are, respected and treasured. We need to recognize the courage of those who dare to live authentic lives.  They are heroes who refuse to play the gender game by someone else rules.

In the words of Holly Near, that Beth sang earlier,

“Something changes in me when I witness someone’s courage

Something changes in me anytime there’s someone standing

For the right to be completely all the good things that we are

Do not forget the children, they are singers in the storm

And when their hearts are threatened, well a fire is bound to start

It wakes us up at midnight, we feel an ancient pain

And I do believe that loves directs the flame”

May we let love direct our flame.  May we let its light shine upon the gender games.