Archive | August 2017

Resist, Rejoice, and Renew – UUP 8-20-2017

 

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Some words by Jonipher Kwong, a poem entitled

Faithless Works:

They say faith without works is dead

So I worked for equality

Next to my queer friends who wanted to get married

And I worked for religious freedom

Next to my Muslim friends who were accused of being terrorists

And I worked for racial justice

Next to my black friends whose lives were affected by police brutality

Yet I didn’t feel fully alive even after working myself to death

Until I let my work become a spiritual practice

Until I let go of my attachment to the outcome

Until I stopped chasing after political issues, one after another

I still believe faith without works is dead

But works without faith is just as lifeless

 

I was an activist before I was religious, and those words ring true for me.  Without some type of faith, political engagement can really suck the joy out of life.  There are always defeats and disappointments, hard fought progress is stopped or, worse, reversed.  Despair, frustration, and bitterness can grow until one can forget to treat even friends with kindness.  Infighting and misplaced righteousness has torn many a positive movement apart.

 

I have experienced that, I have seen it and I have lived it.  Many of you have lived it too.  Sometimes it even happens in churches.

 

I was worried when I went to New Orleans in June for our Unitarian Universalist General Assembly. A pattern of white supremacy within our association had been called out by brave Unitarian Universalists of color. There was defensiveness and some serious mistakes by some of our leadership which resulted in some significant resignations, including that of our national President.  Our well-respected Moderator was diagnosed with a fast-moving cancer and he died within a matter of weeks. Both of our two nationally elected offices were vacant.

 

What was going to happen?  Would our faith be torn apart by the same forces that were tearing apart our country and the whole world?   Would we find the courage and wisdom to resist not only the forces of evil that surrounded us, but also the fear that lived inside of us?

 

So, I was very worried.  I knew what was happening within was in part the result of what was going on in the world.  After the election, people of color, queer people, people with disabilities of all kinds, people who identify as Jewish or Muslim, immigrants, felt even more vulnerable than they had before.  The list goes on to include everyone who is marginalized in some way, even women who are a majority in numbers but not in power, and of course that list includes all of the people that love someone whose very worth and dignity, whose actual life in many cases, is under direct attack.

 

So no wonder, so no wonder, that folks became more sensitive to instances of white supremacy, of sexism, of all the “isms” that afflict our culture, even the culture of our faith tradition.

 

I worried, but I shouldn’t have.  I should have had more faith that who we are as Unitarian Universalists would help us through even this hard time.

 

My experience at both General Assembly and Ministry Days was simply amazing, and renewed my faith and my commitment.

 

Our national board named three African American co-presidents who led with grace, compassion, and courage.  The Minister’s association’s worship included voices of ministers of color and other marginalized groups who spoke their truths as clearly as they described their visions.  Co-moderators were appointed who led the business portions of our meetings with humor, transparency, and a flexibility that was a real joy to witness.

 

We tackled white supremacy in numerous workshops and in healing spaces reserved for people of color.

 

That work is far from done – Let me share an example of something I learned in one of the workshops, something that I don’t think was a part of the lesson plan.  The workshop was described as a place to sing some of the music in our hymnal that comes out of the African American heritage.  The room was crowded and it was clear there weren’t going to be enough hymnals for those sitting in the back.  As often happens, there were plenty of seats up front.  The workshop leader asked those in the back to move up front so they could share a hymnal.  And then, a white woman in the back questioned this, saying it would be much better if some of the hymnals were handed to those in the back.

It was subtle, it was likely unconscious, but it was a clear example of how white supremacy can function in a religiously liberal setting.  I caught the eye of the African American woman sitting next to me who also noticed the sense of entitlement that seemed to prompt that demand.  The facilitator simply said no, we aren’t going to do that.  Too often white folks think we know better and that our needs and ideas should take priority, even if we are late to the party.  Listening, really listening, to the stories and experiences of a very diverse Unitarian Universalism was an important part of that week in New Orleans.

 

It was a joy that our youth from this church were there to experience it as well.  Next week, they will be sharing some of their experiences with you.

 

I could go on about general assembly, it was a full and fruitful time.

 

But our world keeps turning, and there is going to be an eclipse of the sun – tomorrow, yes?

 

What a metaphor a solar eclipse is.  Especially for us, who light our chalice each week for the light of truth, the warmth of love and the energy of action.  We cannot let that light go out.  We cannot let the forces of hate and bigotry, we cannot let fascism, because that is what it is, we cannot let it blot out our sun or dim our chalice.  The symbol of our chalice, as most of you know, was created during WWII when we, as a faith, took a stand against the Nazi regime and all it stood for.

 

Many Unitarian Universalists were in Charlottesville last weekend, including Susan Frederick Gray, our newly elected national president, the first woman to ever serve in that position.  Arm in arm with her were other clergy, including Jeanne Pupke, who had run against Susan in one of the pleasantest elections I have ever witnessed.  Many were trained, many were veterans of non-violent resistance actions.  Facing armed Nazi’s screaming racist, homophobic, and anti-Semitic curses at them was a very different experience than they had ever had before.  What courage that took.  What faith they had.

 

They were not safe.  They could have, and almost were, beaten.  They could have been killed.  Heather Heyer was murdered that day and many others were hurt.

 

During WWII no one was really safe from the Nazis, and I believe no one is safe today.  They have come for the immigrants already.  They have attacked Mosques and synagogues, they have burned down the houses of gay activists as happened in Michigan a couple of weeks ago.

 

What is happening is frightening; it can be overwhelming; and it can freeze our souls to numbness and despair.

 

We need to resist this evil with all that is in us, and we can do so with joy, rejoicing in the fact that we are not alone in this struggle against hate.  We can do so with faith, knowing that as long as we remain true to our values, with our tradition as a guide, and the power of love as our engine, the forces of evil will not prevail.  Our spirits will be renewed and our world restored.

 

I will end with these words by Anne Barker.  She names the pain and she names the love that abides:

 

When the Unimaginable Happened

 

When we heard the news, saw the wreckage, felt the paralyzing blow…

Our hearts broke open – and spilled out – into our hands

And there we were

Watching our Love seep between our fingers

Watching our fragile Love pour out all over us.

Watching our Love seem to slip away.

 

When the unimaginable happened,

The ache we felt-

As if Love was being lost

Was the ache of Love’s despairing truth.

 

This is the Love that no one chooses,

the loss so out of order, so profound,

the Love we did not ever want to know.

 

And yet, the source of this despair,

the reason our hearts cleave and flow,

is because they know the fullness.

 

This is the Love of truth and beauty,

Love that spans the web of being,

Uniting each of us within its timeless form.

 

When we heard the news,

Our hearts broke open, spilled into our hands

And there we stared at Love, lamenting,

“What am I to do with this?”

 

And with these raw and tender yearnings

We will – beat after precious beat-

Seek wholeness once again

 

It will take time to find our balance

To grieve, if we will make the room.

Remember, friends, this is the right thing

This ache within our deepest beings.

Know that all these things are normal

To feel disrupted, empty or undone.

 

Our hearts broke open and the Love that is still true

Draws us once again together, story by story, step by step,

Into places of tender knowing, remembering

To restore us, mend us, piece by broken piece.

 

This is the Love that runs between us,

Sustaining force of restoration,

The Love that nourishes and feeds us,

Binds us, each, to our collective core.

 

We grieve…and march….and weep….and sing

And through the pain – but not despite it –

Love will repair us, not the same, but stronger in some places,

Honoring memories like treasures,

Living out our lives’ potential

In the shadow of the trespass

In the warmth of one another

In the light of what, restored, we will become.

 

May it be so, Blessed Be.

 

 

 

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