Top of the Mountain @UUP 1/15/17

 

That song by Sweet Honey in the Rock (Would you Harbor Me), an a cappella group of African American women activists, almost always brings me to tears.  Who would you harbor?  As Unitarian Universalists, our congregations have long harbored some of the outcasts of our larger society – religious heretics and skeptics, lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people are the most obvious of the groups that have found shelter with us over the years. We have also provided a religious home for interfaith couples and their children.

 

Today is the Sunday closest to the Martin Luther King holiday, and I think it is even more important this year that we look to his example so that we can find the courage to open our hearts wide enough so that all who seek shelter can find a safe harbor with us.  Would we harbor a Christian, a Muslim, a Jew?

 

Our President Elect has said he is planning on having American Muslims register with the government.  Will you be willing to register as a Muslim in order to help defeat this horrible and Un-American plan?

 

Becoming a Muslim is fairly simple, one only needs to say the Shahada, the Muslim statement of faith, twice, with sincerity.  lā ʾilāha ʾillā-llāh, muḥammadur-rasūlu-llāh or in English: There is no god but God. Muhammad is a prophet of God.

 

Personally, I don’t have a problem with that statement of faith.  As a Unitarian Universalist, my theology is grounded in a belief that if there is a divine presence in the universe; that presence is universal, open to all and loving all.  Muhammad spoke of that presence as have many others that I would name prophets of that one light that guides us all toward justice and wholeness. So think, as the days before our new president takes office grow shorter and shorter, think about what you might be willing to do.

 

There is one thing that is, I think, critical for our survival in this new age, and that is holding onto our dreams for a better world.  Our outgoing President spoke to this in his farewell address, but it is a truth that bears repeating.

 

Langston Hughes, an African American poet who was part of the Harlem Renaissance and also a gay man, had this to say about dreams:

 

Hold fast to dreams

For if dreams die

Life is a broken-winged bird

That cannot fly.

 

Hold fast to dreams

For when dreams go

Life is a barren field

Frozen with snow.

 

I don’t want to live like broken winged bird.

We cannot let our dreams die, no matter how long or how hard we have to work to make them real.

Faith can help, as in our responsive reading this morning, “With this faith we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair, a stone of hope.”

 

We have all known despair.  Even after all these years, Martin Luther King’s dream is not yet realized.  People still need to proclaim that black lives matter, because too often, it seems that they don’t.  The last election fanned the flames of the racial hatred that has always been a part of the American story.  It feels like we are moving backward, not forward into making the dream a reality.

 

A song we did not sing today because it was a little too challenging musically if you don’t know it well, is hymn #149.  You might want to look it up and glance at some of the words.  Often called the Negro National Anthem, it is being sung this morning in most African American Churches and many of our Unitarian Universalist congregations as well.  It is a song of hope, but it also names the despair, the hard times.  The second verse in particular, “stony the road we trod, bitter the chastening rod, felt in the days when hope unborn had died, yet with a steady beat, have not our weary feet come to the place for which our fathers sighed. We have come over a way that with tears have been watered, we have come treading our path through the blood of the slaughtered.”  That verse references both slavery and the civil war, yet ends with a vision of a bright star of hope.

 

We are entering into hard times again, but the star is still shining if we look for it.

The Rev. Dr. King was not a Unitarian Universalist, although he and his wife did attend one of our churches for a time.

 

It was not an accident, however, that there were more Unitarian Universalist ministers involved in the civil rights struggle movement than from any other predominantly white denomination. Some of them gave their lives, most notably the Rev. James Rheeb, who died after being beaten by a gang of white segregationists.

 

Our faith tradition is one that lives in this world. If we had a Holy Trinity in this faith of ours, it would be Justice, Love, and Compassion.

Dr. King always tried to live his life guided by love.  He was a visionary, an activist for justice, but most of all; he was a man of faith that believed in love.

He stood tall and he walked proud.

He faced dogs and fire hoses, and finally an assassin’s bullet, but he never lost sight of love.  He reached out to both his enemies and to those that hung back on the sidelines.

Near the end of his life he also worked to end the Viet Nam war and he worked to end poverty.  His life was not about a single issue.

Our faith gives us so much, a welcoming place, a place where we can feel accepted, where we can be free to be who we are, where we can follow both our heads and our hearts, where we can find a place to be whole.  But our faith also is a demanding one, one that asks us repeatedly to keep learning and growing, and doing.  It isn’t easy to walk our talk.  It isn’t easy to live according to our values.

 

Unitarian Universalists worked to abolish slavery in this country.  We worked for child labor laws, and for women’s rights.  Many of us marched with Dr. King.

We have been in the front lines in the struggle for full equality for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people.  We are involved in immigrant rights and the Black Lives Matter movement.

But action can be risky.  James Reeb and Martin Luther King were both murdered. Many others have also lost their lives in similar ways.  But what is most important is not how they died, but how they lived.

We don’t have to be a James Rheeb, or a Martin Luther King to follow in their footsteps, to keep their dreams alive.  Not just their dreams, but also our own dreams, and the dreams of our children and all who will come after them.

I want tell you some of what MLK said in a speech he gave, at our Unitarian Universalist General Assembly in 1966.  It wasn’t one of his most famous speeches and it isn’t quoted often, but it was addressed directly to Unitarian Universalists and can, I think, speak to us today.

Dr King told us that the church needs to stay awake and be responsive to what is going on in the world.

“Certainly the church has a great responsibility” he said, “because when the church is true to its nature, it stands as a moral guardian of the community and of society.

“It has always been the role of the church to broaden horizons, to challenge the status quo, and to question and break mores if necessary.”

“It is not enough for the church to work in the ideological realm, and to clear up misguided ideas. To remain awake through this social revolution, the church must engage in strong action programs”

MLK changed hearts and minds.  He changed the world.  But he didn’t do it alone.  Thousands marched with him, thousands went to jail, and many were killed, as he was, by violence.

Martin Luther King did the eulogy for James Rheeb, and in that eulogy he spoke of hope, saying he was not discouraged by the future, despite the heartache, despite the tragedy that was all around him.

He faced despair, a whole mountain of it.  A system of segregation that many believed would never really change.  But in his dream he climbed that mountain of despair and saw a vision of the other side.  He carved a stone of hope from that mountain, one that kept his dream alive.

Many of us are in despair today.  We are in despair over the state of the world, the wars, the impending environmental disasters, the racism; the massive scale of human suffering that exists all around the world.

Some of us may also be in despair over something that is going on in our own individual lives, a relationship gone bad, a health crises, a job loss, a need for housing, or for even a little bit of financial security.

We need to keep dreaming.  We need to keep doing, to keep on working, making the effort, and keep taking the risks.  The largest problem can be tackled, step-by-step and piece-by-piece.  Work for justice.  Do your part to help heal the planet.  Ask for help when you need it.  Dare to keep on dreaming. If we keep dreaming together we can make those dreams, those visions of a better world, of a better life; we can make those dreams come true.

I will end with these words by MLK

“When our days become dreary with low-hovering clouds of despair, and when our nights become darker than a thousand midnights, let us remember that there is a creative force in this universe, working to pull down the gigantic mountains of evil, a power that is able to make a way out of no way and transform dark yesterdays into bright tomorrows. Let us realize the arc of the moral universe is long but it bends toward justice.”

We are part of that creative force that will find a way to keep bending that arc toward justice.  May it be so.

 

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3 responses to “Top of the Mountain @UUP 1/15/17”

  1. Genie says :

    Well penned, though-provoking, and the video adds to the message.

    • revtheresanovak says :

      Thanks – glad you like the video Sweet Honey in the Rock totally rocks and we need their music badly these days . (I liked your poetry on your blog)

      • Genie says :

        Sweet Honey on the Rock, are revolutionaries, songs have begun revolutions, and it’s time for a revolution: Truth, Justice and Peace.
        Not rhetoric, the actual attributes as the True North actions by politicians who actually do work for the people, not big business and their power mad egos.

        Than ever so much for your kind feedback about my poetry.

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