Grief #Orlando

Remembering, a year later..

Sermons, Poetry, and Other Musings

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Where will our grief go

If our tears should ever dry?

Where will our fear go

If our heartbeats ever slow down again?

Where will our rage go

If our bodies ever stop their shaking?

Our lives, our loves, are a river

Try to damn it though they do

Kill us with bullets and Bibles

Ban us from bathrooms

And let the white rapists go free.

Hearts breaking,

Bodies shaking

Still we flow

On forever on

Until we finally swim free

In that warm sea

Filled by our tears.

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Tired and Yearning

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“Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed, to me:
I lift my lamp beside the golden door.”  – Emma Lazerous

 

Tired so tired

We need another golden door.

Our own poor masses

No longer can breathe

The toxic soup of lies

That spew from factories of hate

 

Refuse fills our beaches

While children drown

On other shores

Homeless walk the streets

Of every town

In our “good ole USA”

 

Time to huddle

Time to pray

Time to plot

And way past time

To lift our lamps

Raising our voices

High and clear.

 

Yearning

Working

To  dry the tears

Of our Lady, Liberty.

 

Zip Line

Clean and sharp as a zip line

The truth zings down

Old vines, twisted leaves

Can only cover

The truth so long

 

Fasten your harness

Carry water and snacks

It is going to be

An amazing ride

At a frightful height

 

Hold onto the truth

Hold onto the line

Balance is everything

Brute strength alone

Won’t keep us down.

 

 

 

Making Promises @UUP 5/21/17

 

As Unitarian Universalists, we are a promise making people. Unitarian Universalism is a covenantal faith, not a creedal one.  What does that mean?

Theodore Parker had this to say:

“Be ours a religion which like sunshine goes everywhere, its temple all space, its shrine the good heart, its creed all truth, its ritual works of love.”

His ritual really was works of love, he was an active abolitionist.  Naming our creed all truth was also a definite challenge to the religious mainstream of his day.

A creed is a statement of beliefs that are taken on faith.  Members of religious institutions that have creeds are expected to agree with the beliefs specified in that creed.  If you question the Virgin birth, the bodily resurrection of Jesus, or his unique divinity as the only son of God, you can be labeled a heretic.  During the reformation, many were burned at the stake for that kind of questioning. Today, people are excommunicated from some faiths because they do not believe or follow all of a church’s teaching.

 

Parker’s line, “creed all truth,” was an affirmation that people should believe what is true and also that truth is subject to testing, to analysis, to science as well as personal experience.

 

Unitarian Universalists believe things, of course we do.

As individuals we all have beliefs, some of which we hold fiercely and passionately.  There are also a lot of beliefs that we hold in common with one another.  Those beliefs are not a creed, however, because they are not a requirement for membership. They are also subject to change based upon new knowledge or new experience.  Our creed, if we have one, really is all truth but what that truth may be at any given time or for any given person is open to both questioning and doubt.

 

Some people consider our seven principles a creed.  Many of us when we first read them, say, “oh yes, that is exactly what I believe!”  Let’s look at them now if you will.  They are in the front of our hymnal.

 

Please note the introductory lines. It does not begin with “I believe” like the Apostles creed.    It says instead that we covenant to affirm and promote– and what does covenant mean?  Simply, a covenant is a promise.  As Unitarian Universalists, we make promises; promises to do things.  The seven principles of Unitarian Universalism are not statements of belief, but rather action plans that we try to follow both as congregations and as individuals.  Action plans! Don’t you love it?

 

What matters most is not what we believe, but what we do, how we treat other people and how we care for our planet.  It is our promises that hold us together, it is the ways we have pledged to live our lives.  That is a lot harder work than simply saying you believe in the virgin birth.

 

Am I treating that person that bugs me with respect?  Am I fair and just when I deal with others? Am I working toward the goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all?  If we are faithful to them, our seven principles call us to that kind of reflection and action every day of our lives.

 

And yes, I guess you have to believe that justice, equity and compassion are good things, so beliefs are a part of it.  But the key is not the belief, but the promise of action.

 

Has anyone here ever been asked, “What do Unitarian Universalists believe?” It is really the wrong question as we believe a lot of different things, in particular about theology.   A better one is perhaps, “What is Unitarian Universalism?”

The best answer is that Unitarian Universalism is a covenantal faith.  We are bound together by our promises.  Covenants are not contracts, but statements of intent.  How we live into those promises, the actions we take in our lives and in the world, are what matters.

 

Covenants also aren’t rules or laws.  You don’t go to jail or get throw out of the community if you break your promises from time to time.  We all break our promises sometimes.  We are human and we do not always live up to our best intentions.

But living according to covenant can bring us back to those intentions when we fail short.  We can forgive each other and ourselves.  Then, we can we begin again together in love.

 

The point is that we have promised to live our lives in a particular way, affirming and promoting certain principles that we have agreed upon.

 

Many of our Unitarian Universalist congregations have also adopted congregational covenants that contain promises about how we will be together in a religious community.

A sample is as follows:

 

“As a member of our Unitarian Universalist community, I covenant to affirm and promote our Unitarian Universalist principles. I am mindful, that as an individual and as a member of this community, I am accountable for my words, deeds, and behavior.   Therefore, whenever we worship, work, or relate to one another, I covenant that I will:

 

Treat others with kindness and care, dignity and respect;

Foster an environment of compassion, generosity, fellowship, and
creativity;

Share in the responsibilities of congregational life;

Speak truth as I experience it and listen to all points of view;

Practice direct communication.  Speak to the individual –

not about them;

Act with respect and humility when I disagree with others;

Seek out understanding and wisdom in the presence of conflict;

Be true to my chosen path although the way may twist and turn, and
support others on their journeys;

Resolve conflicts through intentional compromise and collaboration
 and, when necessary, request facilitation and/or mediation. “

 

The members of our board of trustees are in the midst of adopting a covenant for the board, promises about how they will work together for the good of the congregation as a whole.

They also think it would be good if we can adopt a congregational covenant, something similar to the one I just read. Such covenants have been proven to enhance the positive feeling of community and to reduce the rancor that can sometimes be involved in conflict situations.  Disagreements are inevitable and if voiced respectfully can actually serve to make a community stronger and more committed to its common mission.  They can help refine that mission and make it real.  But nothing will drive people away faster than conflicts that are not discussed openly, respectfully, and directly.

 

Being in a religious community that really lives our values is very hard work.  How many of you have been hurt by an unkind word by someone you thought was a friend?

What if you discover that you have hurt someone else by a thoughtless act or comment?  How did you get back in right relationship?  A covenant can help with that, as it is a reminder of how we have promised to be with each other.

 

Like marriage vows, which are a form of covenant, covenants of right relationship are best if they are created by those who are making the promises to each other.

 

Those of you who have participated in Chalice circles all have some recent experience in creating covenants.

Those covenants vary, but there are some common themes such as listening respectfully, keeping personal information confidential, sharing time fairly, and honoring the commitment to show up.

 

If UUP decides to create a congregational covenant, then each of the members will need to reflect upon what is important to them in creating and maintaining a strong and resilient religious community.  How do you want to handle conflict?  What is the difference between gossip and sharing someone else’s news?

 

Speaking directly to each other and not about each other is probably the hardest promise in any covenant.   What fun it is to complain to a sympathetic ear about something someone else has done!  How much harder it is to tell the person directly that you don’t like what they did and why.

 

One clarification on that: it really isn’t necessary to tell people to their face every little thing we don’t like about them.  We all have personal flaws and quirks that it would be a bit rude to have pointed out to us.  We all make mistakes.  But if we are upset enough about something that we begin to gossip or complain to others about someone else, then we need to express those feelings directly.

It is about respect.  It is how most of us would like to be treated.  It also prevents misinformation from being spread and the community becoming unsettled by rumors and innuendo.  Acting with respect and humility when you disagree with someone is also important.  None of us can be right all of the time, and opinions expressed in arrogance can be very destructive in any community.

 

We also have a culture, both as a nation and as a faith tradition, that tends to be suspicious about anyone in any authority, and that tendency can make it difficult for anyone serving in a leadership capacity.  It is not always just about the minister, although the minister rarely escapes such reactions, and most of us have learned to expect it, even if it is not pleasant.

 

How many of you have served on the board or on a committee and received criticisms that were hurtful? That demeaned your character, ability, or your intentions?  Luckily it doesn’t happen very often here, but when it does it can be very hurtful.

 

A congregational covenant that establishes a practice of acting with respect and humility when we disagree with each other, of treating others with kindness and care, can go a long way in making the inevitable disagreements less personal and hurtful.

 

There are literally hundreds of congregational covenants that have been adopted by Unitarian Universalist congregations.

If UUP wants to create one of its own, a good way to start would be to create a task force of interested members who could look at a number of samples and then develop a draft to propose to the congregation.  If you would be interested in participating in such a task force, please let me or a board member know.

 

I will end with a poem by the Rev. Derrick Jackson

 

We Are Called

In these times, we are called:

Called to step into the mess and murk of life

Called to be strong and vulnerable

Called to console and to challenge

Called to be grounded, and hold lofty ideals

Called to love in the face of hate
We are called

And it is not easy

And we will not always agree

And we will yell, and scream and cry

And we will laugh and smile and sing

We are called to be together

There is so much work to do

And we cannot do it alone

We need one another

Holding each other accountable to our covenants, to the holy, to love and justice

In these times, we are called.

 

Bottom line, the test of faith in a Unitarian Universalist congregation is not about believing the right thing; it is rather about doing what is right.  May we all strive to live up to our highest aspirations for the common good.

Blessed Be and Namaste

Building a New Way – UUP 5/7/17 #UUWhiteSupremacyTeachIn

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Sermon notes:

A couple more short readings:

From THE INVISIBILITY OF WHITENESS By john a. powell

White people have the luxury of not having to think about race. That is a benefit of being white, of being part of the dominant group. Just like men don’t have to think about gender. The system works for you, and you don’t have to think about it.

So they live in white space and then they don’t have to think about it. First of all, they think about race as something that belongs to somebody else. The blacks have race; maybe Latinos have race; maybe Asians have race. But they’re just white. They’re just people. That’s part of being white.

from the Rev. Karen Quinlan,

But more often, I’m learning, true change happens only when we take the time and the risk of sitting with something hard. True change in the world is intimately related to our internal transformation, which is intimately related to our presence to our selves.

Culture is simply everything that’s around us. At some point in our lives, we learn that there are other ways of being. Our human tendency is to think that ours is better than theirs.

When we are white, thinking that ours is better is supported by the fact that our social and political systems have been built through the same frame through which we’re looking.

We learn that our way is the right way and the best way. Simply put, this is white supremacy culture.”

She also says, ‘Come on and look inside you–it’s the best place to start.’ The greatest revolution is a simple change of heart.’  So that is where I am going to start.  I am going to tell some stories about how I, as a white woman, learned about race and about white supremacy.  Just to be clear, white supremacy is the system we all live in, you don’t have to be a racist to participate in it, or, if you are white, benefit from it.  As I tell my story, you might want to reflect on whether your own is similar or not.

I grew up in Watsonville, CA, a relatively small, primarily agricultural town.  Unlike many white people who grew up in racially segregated suburbs, the town was very ethnically diverse and I was aware of that from an early age.  Many of my friend’s parents were first generation immigrants and English was their second language if they spoke it at all. Our next door neighbor, who took care of me while my mother worked, spoke mainly Portuguese.  I remember my mother explaining, when I was very young, that the town was settled by waves of immigrants who came mainly to work on the farms.  Italians, Slavonian’s, Portuguese, Germans, Filipinos, Japanese, Chinese, Okies, and Mexicans were the groups she mentioned.  I asked what we were, and she said Okies.  Everyone had an ethnicity of some sort in my mother’s opinion, and she used it to describe virtually everyone we knew.

Phyllis was my Chinese friend, John was Slavonian, David was my Jewish friend, and I was named after my mother’s German friend, Theresa.

I remember asking her what we were.  She said we were Okies.  She’d moved from Texas to California in the 1930’s to find work as a waitress in Hollywood.

I have been thinking about Jordan Edwards a lot this week.  He was the young African American teenager who was recently killed by the police in Texas.  He was only 15 and had been at a party with his brothers and some friends.  When someone said that the police had been called, they got in their car and tried to leave.  An officer shot at the departing car, and Jordan was killed by a bullet to his head.

I have been thinking about it a lot, partly because when I was a teenager I went to a friend’s party. Some of the kids were drinking and her parents called the cops.  We all got in our cars and tried to get away.  In a panic, my friend David backed his car into a muddy field and we got stuck, but finally managed to get the car out and get away. We were scared, but because we were white, our lives were not at risk.  The worst case scenario would have been a phone call to our parents and being grounded.  That was white supremacy at work although I did not realize it at the time.

I was not totally unaware of racism as a teen, however.  My US History teacher in high school, Mr. Hashimoto, had been interned with his family during WWII and talked about that on more than on occasion.

He also told us that it was because of racism that the US dropped the atom bomb on Japan rather than on Germany.  He taught me to question things.

In college, although I had the opportunity to hear Eldridge Cleaver, Angela Davis, Bobbie Seale and other Black Panthers speak during those turbulent times, it was also the first time I was exposed to a pretty monolithic white middle class culture.  Almost everyone in my dorm was white and most of them came from upper middle class white suburbs.  White supremacy became the water I swam in.

I saw the class issues, because I was a scholarship student, but my social life was almost completely white and I was clueless about it. We were all for racial justice, but we didn’t really know any black people at all. One thing I have learned over time, is that while ideas and values are good things, you can’t really know someone else unless you take the time to listen.  You can’t live our first principle without a deeper understanding of the inherent worth and dignity of all, which is so much more complicated than just accepting the sometimes very self-centered individualism of people with a lot of privilege.

I learned so much during my 25 years working for Social Security in Richmond CA.  With almost 2000 employees when I started, it was something like 40% African American with a good mix of other ethnic groups.  White people were not the majority, although something like 60% of the management staff was white.

What that meant is that people of color felt safe enough to talk about race and racism openly.

During the OJ Simpson trial, there was a clear racial divide and people argued about it.  Most of the white folks thought he was guilty, and most of the black folks wanted him to be freed.  When the verdict was announced, the black people cheered.  A black man accused of killing a white woman was declared innocent.  It was an historic event, something that rarely happens when you live under the thumb of white supremacy.  I learned something very real about the reality of black lives

Another conversation:

I shared with a black co-worker, a lay sermon I wrote about how Anne and I created our family as lesbian parents.  (It was my very first sermon.) She cried when she read it, and told me she thought her church was wrong in how they treated gay people.  She then told me of going to a sleepover camp where she was the only black child.  She was 9 or 10 and could not swim very well.  All of the other kids had swum out to a platform on the lake and she was left on the shore.  She gathered her strength and her courage and swam as best she could out to the platform.  She was exhausted when she got there, but when she tried to get on the platform to rest, the other kids wouldn’t let her.  I am not sure if they used the “N” word or not.  She did not say, but she cried again as she told me of almost drowning as she made her way back to shore.  I was so honored that she trusted me enough to share that story. I did not make any excuses for the kids who had been mean to her.  I just cried with her.

That story was a hard one, and I have more like that, but I have a few funny stories too.  My assistant manager Hazel was complaining that I got internet access at my desk before she did. She said it was racist, that all the black managers were going to be last.  I looked at her with a straight face and said, maybe, but maybe they are just giving the internet to all the gay managers first, because everyone knows how good we are at technology.  We laughed for a solid half an hour about that one.

Conversations about race can be difficult.  They can be uncomfortable.

The history is full of pain, and too often white people can get defensive because they don’t want to feel guilty.  The very term, white supremacy, is one that is particularly hard for those of us who consider ourselves liberal and certainly not racist.

But you don’t have to identify as a racist in order to acknowledge white privilege and that we live in a culture, a system, where white people and white culture is what is most highly valued.  It shows up in all kinds of decisions, including hiring, including within Unitarian Universalism, including in our headquarters, our regions and our congregations. Despite principles and written commitments to diversity, the white candidate is often seen as just the “better fit.”  My friends who are ministers of color know that they are less likely to be called to serve a UU congregation than are their white peers.

Straight white cisgender men are also still the most likely to be called to serve our larger churches.

Racism, sexism, homophobia, and transphobia are unfortunately very much alive within Unitarian Universalism.  It isn’t always blatant, and the specific instance can be complicated, but if we were really who we say we are, who we want to be, the end result would be different.

Driving home to Utah from the Phoenix General Assembly I was stopped at the Arizona border in what was clearly a speed trap.  The state trooper was almost apologetic to this older Anglo woman who maybe looked like his mom.  I got a ticket, but he did not call immigration to see if I could be deported.  I wasn’t shot and killed as so many people of color are during traffic stops. I did not have an Arabic sounding name so I wasn’t a terrorist.  He didn’t ask to search my car looking for weapons or drugs.

I was white, so I was automatically one of the “good people” the “safe people.”  The system of white supremacy took care of me.  Every day of my life I have reaped the benefits of being white.

And every day, I have suffered from it too.  It has kept me separated from other people me so that those moments of sharing across racial lines are as rare as they are precious.  I can’t really be free until everyone else is free too.

This is too long already, so I am going to end by asking you to think some about your own lives and how you learned about and understood racism and white supremacy.  You might want to share those thought with others during coffee hour.

This work will take a lifetime, but it is what will finally save us.   We can all find some of the amazing grace we will sing about in our closing song, one that was written by a man who earned his living as a slave trader. Blessed Be

Whitelash

The genteel become surreal

When white supremacy is named

Clash and slash

It’s a real whitelash

 

Why can’t we white folks

Understand

Its not about us

Our ideas our feelings

 

 

Listen learn

Center on the whole

Swallow defensiveness

And remember to breathe

 

Our advice is not needed

Our opinions are fluff

We can cheer brave folks on

Offer support and yes love

 

This whole world is a mess

But enough is enough

Resistance is reality

Breaking through at long last.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rolling Stones UUP 4/16/17

 

easter stone

What an effort it must have been

To climb down from that cross

So many centuries ago

They thought you were dead forever

It certainly looked like that

You’d prayed your last prayer

Healed your last leper

Driven out your last demon.

They even buried you.

It must have felt so good

To lay your head down

The funeral cloths were soft.

The darkness was comforting

So weary you were

Tired, hurt, bleeding.

You’d seen so much

Suffered so much

Done so much

What harm could it do

To give into rest

For a few days

It must have been hard

To hear the weeping

Of those who had loved you

Of those who had betrayed you

The stone was heavy

But you had to push it aside

Rolling away defeat

Banishing hopelessness

Overcoming fear.

What an effort it must have taken

To come back not knowing

What people would think

How they would respond

Would they think the miracle

Was only about you?

Thank you for letting us know

That we each have the chance

The opportunity, the responsibility

To be reborn

Resurrected.

Again and again.

Like the earth

Each spring

Each morning

Forever and ever

Amen.

 

Happy Easter. There are other holidays at this time of year.  The Jewish Passover celebration is one of liberation, of freedom from slavery. The ritual meal, the Seder, recalls the time the Jewish people spent in Egypt as slaves, and tells the story of their escape to the Promised Land.  That holiday can hold deep meaning for those who do not identify as Jewish.  We weren’t able to hold a Seder this year but next year it should happen.

 

Oester is the pagan celebration of spring and fertility, usually celebrated at the Spring equinox.  It is where we get the name Easter, and it is also where the Easter Bunny comes from. Rabbits don’t normally lay eggs, but the Goddess Oester was in the form of a rabbit, an animal known for its fertility.  She is always portrayed with an egg.  The holiday holds meaning for those who do not identify as pagan.  It is also a particularly fun one for children.

 

Easter is the story of Jesus and his death and resurrection.  A Christian story, it too holds meaning for those who do not identify as Christian.

 

The Easter story is a rich one, an important one, and not an easy one to understand.  It has been the source of hope and renewal for millions.  Millions have fought and died over how it should be understood.

It is good to be celebrating Easter this morning as a Unitarian Universalist!

We can dig into the story, ask some hard questions about it, and – best of all – we do not have to agree on all the answers. No religious wars here.

Easter is most simply a story about a victory of life and love over death.

 

If Easter had not happened, Jesus would have likely been remembered as simply one more in a long line of Hebrew prophets.  Elijah, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Amos, and so many others who called their people back to God, to faithfulness, and back to caring for others, particularly for the poor and oppressed.

 

He was a teacher and a healer, traveling around preaching to ordinary people with a fairly ragtag group of followers.

He made some people mad.  The occupying Romans certainly weren’t happy with him; some of his followers thought he was the messiah, a new king that would free his people and bring Israel back to her glory.

 

The established religious authorities weren’t crazy about him either. He ranted about the money lenders in the temple.  And, just like the pay day lenders of today, I am sure they made a lot of financial contributions to those who had the power.  He healed people and he didn’t charge them for it.  He fed the hungry, also for free.  Yes, he must have made a lot of people mad.

 

So who was Jesus?  Was he a man, a malcontent, a prophet, a lunatic, or a God?  Find your own answer to that question, and cherish the freedom you have to do so.

 

And, who killed Jesus? Was it the Romans or was it the Jews?  Or was his death planned all along by God?  People have died because of the various answers to that question.  Jesus and all of his followers were Jewish, but still Jews have been blamed for his death by many Christians over the centuries and even today.  Would the holocaust have happened without that version of the Easter story?  And if his death was God’s plan, why would the Jews or even Judas be blamed?

 

I say it was the Romans, with the strong encouragement of both the religious and secular authorities of the day.  It was the 1% trying to protect their wealth and power from a movement that frankly scared them.   It is the answer that makes the most sense to me, but you get to decide for yourself what makes sense to you.

 

The idea that it was God’s plan is worth exploring more deeply, however, as it raises an important theological issue.

 

The issue even has a name, “theodicy.” The term comes from the Greek and involves the effort to reconcile the traditional characteristics of God as all good, all loving, and all-powerful with the fact of evil in the world.  In simple terms, the question is why do bad things happen to good people?  If God is running the world, then why does God let those things happen?

I handle that issue for myself by understanding God as a force for good, and not as an all-powerful being.  Others believe that even bad things come from God, as lessons, as tests, or as punishments.

It is an issue worth exploring, and the Easter story is a prime example of how the same event can be interpreted in different ways.

 

Jesus was a good person and a bad thing happened to him.

 

It is clear that Jesus despaired.  He felt that his God had left him, forsaken him.  It is an emotion that I think all of us have felt at one time or another.  Even if we have never believed in God, there are times when most of us have been alone and afraid and have felt that there is no help for us anywhere in the universe.  It is not so very hard to identify with the suffering Jesus.

 

We can also identify with his followers and their grief and fear after his death.  Some of us will never forget when Martin and Malcolm were murdered, when the Kennedy brothers were killed, or when Harvey Milk was slain. Many of us wept bitter tears at those times.  I know I did.

 

But Easter, although an upsetting story in so many ways has a miracle at the end. The stone gets rolled away and Jesus comes back to life – or at least his spirit and his message lived on.

 

Easter can also lead us to reflect on what is blocking our own pathway to a more abundant life.

What is the stone that seals us into a metaphorical tomb?  Is it an addiction that has made our life unmanageable?

Is it a relationship that isn’t working, a job that is so tedious that it exhausts you for anything else, an earlier trauma that just won’t heal? Did someone else put that stone in your path? Is it racism, sexism, homophobia, or your social class? What is holding you back from being who you were meant to be?

 

Can you, do you have the courage and strength to begin to roll that stone away all by yourself?  Most of us need some help, because those stones are very heavy and are hard to get rolling.  It is also scary, as it can be comfortable in a tomb, safe and protected from further harm.

 

The resurrection of Jesus can be interpreted as a metaphor, and some see it as a fact.  In either case, what does it mean?  Does it signify hope for all of us?  Did his death save us?  Who do we mean by us?  What do we mean by salvation?

 

Very early in Christianity, there was a lot of argument about this.  OK, there is still a lot of argument about this.

The earliest Universalists, prior to the 4th century even, were divided over some of these issues, but they were in agreement that if the death of Jesus provided salvation, it was salvation for everybody by the grace and goodness of God.  No exclusions.

No restricting salvation to just Christians; it is universal.  Not everyone agreed then and not everyone agrees now.

There is a New Testament verse that is often quoted that deals with some of this.  John 3:16

“For God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.”

 

The conservative interpretation of this text has caused a lot of grief.  It freaked me out when I was younger.  “God loves us, he sacrificed his son, believe this or you will die.”  The book of John is the most mystical of the Gospels, and taking it at all literally doesn’t make any sense to me, and it also doesn’t really do it justice.

Are humans so evil that such a sacrifice would be required?  The verse itself says God gave his son out of love.  Perhaps it was a simple gift, and not a sacrifice.

Maybe the message from God was instead, “Here is this man in whom I have invested my spirit, listen to what he says, believe him, follow him, and life will come to you.”

The Easter story should be one of pure joy, of pure relief.  There was suffering and there was death, but out of it came new life and new hope.  Jesus reappeared after only three days.  The tomb was empty.  He came back to life.  His followers saw him in ordinary people and in each other.

 

Can we listen to this story of hope? Can we find out how to get our own heavy stones rolled away so we can find our way back to life?  Can we learn to do justice and love mercy?  Can we love our neighbor as ourselves? Can we see every human being as both our parent and our child?  How long will it take us?  Are three days enough?  Three years?  Three decades? Three thousand years?

 

Those questions are for each of you to answer, each in your own way.  But as Unitarian Universalists we are called to life, to be born and reborn again and again.

 

You can live with your questions, cherish your doubts, and believe what you must, but don’t let anything keep you shut inside a cold tomb of despair, afraid of trying new things, afraid of trying. Come back to Life instead, rejoice in the springtime, and savor the good that you find around you.

 

Come back to hope and commitment; come back to searching for a better way; roll those heavy stones away.  Blessed Be. Happy Easter.

Boundless

My rage flows boundless

From the molten core of my heart.

 

How long

Will this go on?

How much

Can one soul take?

 

Ancient as the earth

The pain of war

Relentless as the wind

The chains that hold us all.

 

The sea overflows with our grief

For lost hopes

While the ashes of our dreams

Wash up on distant shores.

 

My rage flows boundless

The fire rises in my throat

Boundless yes

But silent?

Not.an.option

Anymore

 

Let the lava flow

Let it melt the walls

Release will ease our hearts

And quiet our fears

 

When the fires cool

Will there be a new land

Children safe at last

We are the ancestors

May we find the courage

To earn the future’s gratitude.

 

 

 

 

 

Morning Light

There is a special quality of light

As a new day dawns

The shadows are still deep

Danger can lurk undisclosed

 

But every budding leaf

Of each new tree is also revealed

Dew sparkles like shattered glass –

Or chains

 

Seize the day

Open eyes can

Bring about the dawn

There is nothing more beautiful

Than justice reborn.

 

 

 

 

 

Your Money and Your Life UUP 4/2/17

Money-Bag

 

Draw the circle wide, that is what our faith is about isn’t it?  We try to welcome all to the circle of this congregation and this faith.  We try to pay attention to those who have been marginalized and we attempt to truly celebrate diversity in all of its manifestations.

 

Just saying something doesn’t make it so, however.  It will take all of us, working together, to live the words from that song and to live the words of our mission statement: Live your sacred, transform through love, act with courage.

 

It will also take money, your money.  We are beginning our annual stewardship campaign, and during this campaign you will be asked to make a financial pledge in support of this congregation and its mission.

 

This year’s theme, created by the stewardship committee with some input from the board is:

 

“Coming Together–Expanding Community–Changing the World!”

 

There are also three specific goals:

–Affirm Our Commitment to Professional Ministry
–Expand Our Religious Education Programs for Children, Youth, and Adults
–Expand Our Leadership for Social and Environmental Justice

 

You will be hearing a lot more about the goals and how they fit into the theme over the next month or so, but today I want to talk about money.

 

Money can’t buy you love, as the song goes, but what is the meaning of money in your life?  How important is it?

 

Say you are walking down a dark alley late at night, and you hear a voice saying, “This is a stick up, give me your money or give me your life.”

 

Some of us may have heard those words and been faced with that actual decision, but for most of us, that stark choice is only something to think about – or maybe worry about.  But the choice is pretty clear; almost all of us would choose life in that situation.   You can’t take it with you, as the saying goes.

 

This isn’t a dark alley.  This is springtime in Petaluma. But I’m going to ask you that same question, “Your money or your life?”

 

A lot of us have lost money over the years and some of us have lost a great deal.  Some of us have never had much money to begin with. There are those that have lost jobs, and those that have lost their homes.  Financial loss or uncertainty can bring an increased tendency to hoard, or at least to be more cautious with our spending.  Some of that is a good thing.

Frankly, almost all of us, even those of us with fairly limited incomes, have gotten into some bad habits over years. Buying more than we need and always getting something new rather than repairing something old.

It hasn’t been good for our pocketbooks, and has been terrible for the environment.   The trash thrown out every day in a typical American household could feed and clothe a whole village for a month in many parts for the world.

 

But when money is tight, we feel insecure.  We are afraid of losing more.  We tend to hold on tighter.

This congregation, like all congregations has experienced financial worry, deferring decisions that might make a difference in how much you can do, both internally and in relationship to the wider world.

 

We need to be careful not to hold on too tight to what money we have, however.  If we confuse our net worth with our inherent worth, we can find we have lost not only money, but also our life.

 

It is actually pretty easy to lose both, your money and your life.  Maybe not easy in the sense that we will literally die if we lose all of our money. That can happen if someone ends up on the street, without food or shelter.  If there isn’t money for medicine or health care, that too can be life threatening.

 

But the real danger, for most of us, is to have hard economic times change us in ways that cause our spirits to die.

 

If we let fear take over, then we can lose all the joy, all the possibilities, all the opportunities for generosity that can still be very much a part of our daily lives.  We can become so cautious that we are always saving for some future rainy day despite the fact that it is already pouring outside and the roof is leaking buckets.  We can let opportunities slip by us because we are convinced things will only get worse.

 

Loss is a funny thing.  It is never fun, but it can also make us appreciate what we have, can help us get our values clarified, and our priorities more in line with who we want to be in the world.  People who have faced a life-threatening illness know this very well.  I have never heard someone on their deathbed say that they wish they had spent more time with their money.  And although some may wish they had more money to leave to their loved ones when they die, most know that it is the love they leave behind that has the most value.

 

Instead, many people who have suffered serious illness come to a realization about what is really important in life.  They treasure more of the moments, they enjoy the sunshine more deeply, and even, sometimes bad weather.

Some, who have lost a loved one to death, also come to take better care of their remaining relationships.

 

Life is indeed short, no matter what we do or don’t do.  A line from one of our hymns says:

“For all life is a gift, which we are called to use to build the common good and make our own days glad.”

 

Make our own days glad.  Now, you have all heard the saying that money can’t buy you happiness.  Money can’t buy you love.  A certain amount is necessary of course.  Survival needs: clothing, shelter, food. Some money for some comfort items beyond the basics helps.  It is nice to be able to go to a movie, eat out once in a while, or take a trip.  But how much money do we really need?

I found this poem by Kurt Vonnegut, most famous for his book, Slaughterhouse Five.  He wrote it after his friend, and fellow author, Joseph Heller died.   Heller wrote Catch 22.  Those of you who didn’t read the books may have seen the movies.

The poem:

Joe Heller

True story, Word of Honor:
Joseph Heller, an important and funny writer
now dead,
and I were at a party given by a billionaire
on Shelter island.

I said, “Joe, how does it make you feel
to know that our host only yesterday
may have made more money
than your novel ‘Catch-22′
has earned in its entire history?”
And Joe said, “I’ve got something he can never have.”
And I said, “What on earth could that be, Joe?”
And Joe said, “The knowledge that I’ve got enough.”
Not bad! Rest in peace!

“The knowledge that I’ve got enough,” we really need to stop awhile and think about what that is, what it means.  The larger consumer culture is always telling us that we don’t have enough, that we need a bigger house, a newer car, the latest fashion, and the most sophisticated electronic device that doesn’t even exist yet.

 

The question, “what is enough?” has been a pretty personal one for me.  As some of you know, I worked for the Social Security Administration for 25 years.  It was a very secure job, and one that paid a fairly good salary.  I could have kept working there another five years and would have received not only the additional salary, but also a much larger pension.

 

My “net worth” would have been much higher than it is today if I had done that.  But I was tired of working there; it wasn’t much of a challenge anymore even though I still loved the work in many ways.  The early retirement pension that was offered seemed like it was enough to get by on.

 

Instead of just staying on the job, I spend four years in seminary and am now been a minister. It is not a decision that I think I will ever regret.

 

Life, my life and your life, is about much more than money.  What makes you feel more alive and what gives your life its purpose and meaning?

I suspect it is not really the size of your bank account, or even of your shrinking stock portfolio, if you were lucky enough to ever have either one of those.

 

Money does have value, but I would maintain that the true value of money lies in how you spend it, not in how much you earn or in how much you have saved.  I had to pay quite a bit of tuition for seminary, but what I learned there and the calling I have found as a result is priceless, way beyond the actual dollar value that could have paid for a very expensive and fancy car.

 

The money I have given to the various good causes I have supported over the years is also worth much more to me than anything I have ever spent on furniture, for instance.  Furniture is nice, nice furniture is even nicer I suppose, but expensive furniture doesn’t have the kind of value that is really important.

 

That gets to some of the questions I am trying to ask today.  Are you spending what money you have on something of real value, either for yourself or for someone else?

 

As I said, you will be getting a lot more information about the stewardship campaign, including an invitation to share some food and talk about what this congregation means to you and what level of financial commitment you are both willing and able to meet.

I want to ask you all of you to consider pledging at the “sustainer level.  It will be in the chart you will receive later, but note that the amount varies by how much income you have.  If your income is around $10,000 per year, you can consider yourself a sustainer of this congregation for $250 a year.  If your income is $100,000 a year, it will cost you $5,000 to say the same thing.

 

The stewardship campaign will be going on all month. Spend some of that time reflecting on how much this community means to you and how much you are willing and even eager to commit to ensuring that it thrives.

 

Is it a matter of your money or your life?  Some churches make promises of a penthouse suite in the celestial kingdom if you pledge generously to their church.

 

I don’t believe what you give to a church will make a difference to you after you die.  But what it just might do is help save your life now, today.

 

True generosity always comes back to the giver. Giving might save your life, give it more meaning.

 

It also might save someone else’s life.

 

Put it all on a scale in your mind’s eye.  Your money or your life, your money or someone else’s life, how do they balance out?  I am not asking anyone to give more than they can or should.  If you are struggling now to meet your basic needs, a token amount is just fine.

But think about what you spend your money on, and what is really valuable in the long run.  Most of us have enough money, much more than we usually realize.  What we don’t have enough of is love, community, and justice.

 

Pat Francis will speak later about how this congregation saved her life.  She isn’t the only one here who has that story to tell.  There are also a lot of other people who need what we have to offer.  Can we draw our circle wide enough to include them?

 

Blessed Be.