Our Theological House Part 3 – How We Worship

 

We gather here together each Sunday, but what are we doing?  Why do we do what we do?  Some of what we do is simply based upon traditions.

 

I really do appreciate that most of you listen to the sermon, but it really is only a small part of the worship service.  Every element, from the welcome, to the music, to the readings, the prayer, the chalice lighting, the offering, and yes, the coffee hour, compose together what is hopefully a meaningful worship service.

 

Our earlier reading explains some of what worship does, but what is worship and what is its goal?  The root of the word “worship” is “worthship”, considering things of worth. “Religion” (religare) means to bind up, to reconnect, to get it all together.  To participate in worship, in this sense, does not require one to have an image of a God.  Atheists get to play too.

So what is the point?

 

According to a document prepared for the Unitarian Universalist Association the aim, the goal, of worship is to, I quote:

“Help order the religious consciousness in the individual and the group. It is to help us know and feel how we relate as individuals to ourselves, to the world, to the totality of being.

 

The aim of common worship is to help us face up to our individual and collective limitations and failures, to open us to sources of creative, healing, transforming, and renewing power. It is to help us discover how that which transcends our narrow individual existence can move us, challenge us, inspire us, stimulate us to think, feel, act, and be. It is to help us declare, celebrate, rejoice in those things we have discovered to be “of worth.”

Leading the Congregation in Worship incorporated a previous document by the Commission, Common Worship: Why and How, which was written on behalf of the Commission by Frederick E. Gillis (Boston: Unitarian Universalist Association, 1981).

For the last two weeks, I have been doing a series of sermons on theology based upon a book called, “A House for Hope.” If you missed them you can read my notes online on my blog.

Briefly, the book uses the metaphor of a house to talk about theology.  The foundation is how we understand God and the relationship of humans to the divine.  This is theology. Our location is our eschatology, how we envision the end of the world and our concept of heaven or hell.  The roof is what protects us from harm: soteriology, the theology of salvation, is what saves us from evil.  The walls our ecclesiology, and are what gather us into a collective space. The doorway is how we engage with the world: missiology, our mission or reason for being.  The rooms are how we create a welcoming home for the spirit: pneumatology, which includes our rituals and worship practices.

 

We covered eschatology and soteriology in prior weeks.  This week we are going to talk some about pneumatology.  We’ll have three left after today: theology, ecclesiology, and missiology.  Hopefully I will get to those later in the year, because I think it is important that religious communities engage the theological questions common to all human experience.  That engagement is what makes us different from social clubs and social justice organizations.

 

Are you ready for pneumatology?  Don’t stress, pneumatology is not as scary as it might sound. The word comes from the Greek pneuma, which means breath or wind.  Rebecca Parker says that,

“Within (a religious community)… there breathes a sense of the Holy, a response to the Sacred Spirit or Spirits present in life, inspiring creativity, compassion and social action.  Worship, art, ritual, and music shape religious community, infusing the atmosphere of its environment, making space for people to breathe.”

 

Take a breath.  Is this a place you can breathe?

I hope so, I hope this is now or will become for you a place where you can breathe in and breathe out, a holy place, where your spirit can be restored.

 

Our Unitarian Universalist worship practices reflect our theologies.  Practices vary from congregation to congregation, but some are common to almost all.

 

Music is critical in worship, because music stirs something that is beyond words, it is the real language of the soul, if the soul has a language at all.

 

We listen to music or we sing and the music resonates with our bodies and the space inside our lungs.  The breath, the spirit begins to move within us and around us. We sing and give voice in word and music to our hopes, our dreams, and sometimes to our fears.  Depending on the song, we might move or clap.

As Unitarian Universalists, we do not believe that the body or the pleasures of the body are sinful.  When we sing or dance, we loosen up a bit, get out of our heads and become connected to our whole selves.  One of the hymns in our hymnal contains the line, “body and spirit united once more.”  That, too, is part of our theology.  We sing together often during our worship services.

 

If a formal welcome is done, we welcome everyone because we believe that every person has inherent worth and dignity and because those of us that believe in God know that God loves everyone, no exceptions.  We use the time of the announcements to invite people into the community, to engagement.

 

Chalice lighting words remind us of why we are here together, of the values of our faith and what our faith requires.  It connects us to other congregations and the denomination as a whole.

The flaming chalice itself is a symbol that was created during World War II when our service committee was working to rescue people from Nazi Germany.  When that flame is lit, our history, our present, and our future are combined during that brief moment.

 

In this congregation, after the chalice lighting, it is traditional to read the affirmation together.  It is also our history, present and future combined.  Some congregations read their mission statement instead.  Both are reminders, and both define the purpose and intention of why we gather in worship.

 

After the opening hymn, here at UUP we call the children up to recite a greeting in both English and Spanish.

I haven’t seen this done in other congregations, but it is a nice touch, a way of more inclusive welcoming. The greeting and the story are both ways of reaffirming the commitment to children and families that has been a part of UUP from its beginning.

 

Our readings are sometimes the sacred texts of the various world religions, but more often they are more secular.  Poetry and prose are both used. Wisdom, we believe, can be found in many places.  There is little we are unwilling to examine for whatever truth or meaning might be found.  Readings from our hymnal can connect us to our wider faith tradition and to the diversity it contains.

 

We sometimes pray together because prayer helps.

Many of us find comfort in prayer, from giving voice to our pain, from sharing the awareness that we are not alone, that if nothing else, compassion can draw us closer together.  Some of us pray to the Holy, however we define that term.  For others, prayer is simply a way of expressing our hopes for a better world.

 

Unitarian Universalist sermons, unlike many other traditions, do not follow a lectionary. The subject matter, other than around holidays, is pretty much up to the preacher and we have what is called a free pulpit and a free pew.  This means, basically that the minister is free to say what they feel needs to be said, and those in the pews get to decide whether they agree or not.

 

 

 

The purpose of the sermon is to open up hearts and minds to something that might not have been felt or thought much about outside of church.  Hopefully, it sometimes changes your mind and maybe even your heart.

 

If a sermon should do that, I don’t believe it is just because of the speaker or even what was said. Instead, it is pneumatology, the spirit working in the interaction and space between the words spoken and what is heard. Yeah, pneumatology is pretty mystical.

 

Our offering is a ritual as well, and an important part of our theology and worship service.  It is partly practical of course, we need money to keep this church going, but frankly, the Sunday morning plate provides for only a small fraction of the resources we need. Instead, the offering is about acknowledging our connection, that giving and receiving is what sustains our lives as well as our spirits.  We breathe out, and the plants breathe in.  No one is really separate and no one is really alone.  Whether you drop in a dollar, a twenty, or a hundred, you are acknowledging that this community is worth something.  Remember the definition of worship, “Worthship,” considering things of worth.

 

The offering is not an admission charge or a fee for service, but an opportunity to participate in something that is worthwhile. I encourage you to approach the offering as the ritual it is, and to put something in the basket each and every week.

 

 

The closing words, and in smaller congregations, sometimes a closing circle, signals the end of the service and the benediction is usually a “sending forth,”, a charge to go out and act with courage to live your values.  The chalice is extinguished but its light still shines.

 

If it worked well, a worship service will have recharged our spiritual batteries and given us the energy to better face the coming week and all the complexities of our lives.

 

The worship committee did a survey recently, essentially asking individuals what parts of our services they found most meaningful.  Members will get a report of the results soon, and some action items resulted, but as expected, there was also a great deal of diversity of opinion.

 

You might want to consider later today, when you reflect back on this service, what parts spoke to you.  Was it the welcome, the music, the candle lighting, the prayer, the sermon, or one of the readings?  Was it simply sitting in the company of other human beings?  Was it how everything flowed together or didn’t?  How was the pneumatology for you today?

 

Then go a step further.  Ask others what they found meaningful.

Maybe it was something that didn’t really speak to you as an individual.  If that is true, try to just listen with curiosity, and without judgement.  Remember that the whole is always greater than the parts, another aspect of our theology and our understanding of the interdependent web of life.

 

Emerson said, “A person will worship something, have no doubt about that…That which dominates our imaginations and thoughts will determine our lives and character.  Therefore, it behooves us to be careful about what we worship, for what we are worshipping we are becoming.”

 

If the worship experience can help inspire us to create more peace and justice in the world, if it can move us to compassion and to forgiveness, if it can comfort us and give us hope, then it is worthy, it is worthwhile.  Blessings on all of you.

 

 

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Our Theological House Part 2 – What Saves us

Pirates and Rabbi’s, Meg Barnhouse and Bob Marley, I love those combinations. It is funny how a mistake, like hearing a word wrong, can lead to an insight you might not have had otherwise.  Sermons work like that sometimes.  There is the one I write, the one I actually speak, and then there are all of the sermons that each of you hear, none of which are exactly the same.  The saying goes that people hear what they want to hear, but I also think that just as often we hear exactly what we need to hear.  We all need different things at different times.  If the spirit is moving as it so often seems to be in this room on Sunday mornings, the possibility of that happening is increased.   Open your ears, open your heart, and let the sun shine in.

 

Last week, I shared some insights that I gained from a class I took by the authors of “A House for Hope.”  If you missed it you can read my notes online on my blog.

 

Briefly, the book uses the metaphor of a house to talk about theology.  The foundation is how we understand God and the relationship of humans to the divine.  This is theology. The walls are what gather us into a collective space.  This is ecclesiology and includes how our religious community is organized and governed.  The rooms are how we create a welcoming home for the spirit: pneumatology, which includes our rituals and worship practices.  The roof is what protects us from harm: soteriology, the theology of salvation, is what saves us from evil.  The doorway is how we engage with the world: missiology, our mission or reason for being.  Finally, there is our location, which is obviously here on this earth, this planet, but how we see this earth, especially the end of the earth, the end of time, is eschatology.

Last week we talked about Eschatology.

 

That sermon introduced the concept of radically realized eschatology is that heaven is right here and right now. This world and this life are sacred.  We stand on holy ground.  Our task is to recognize that fact and to treat each other and the earth with gentle care and with respect.  The kingdom of God is among us.

 

With this understanding, we are drawn to repair and heal what is broken, not because it will bring about some perfect future world, but simply because the dance we are doing here is a holy dance.  Some of you remember that, right?  If you don’t or weren’t here last Sunday, don’t worry.

 

Today, we are going to check out the roof of Parker’s theological house, see how the shingles are doing, and notice if there are any pirates about.  What keeps us warm?  What keeps us dry?  What saves us?  What can shelter us from life’s hurricanes? Are you ready for another new word?  Soteriology is the theology about salvation.  Another way to think about it is; “What delivers us from evil?”

 

Anne Lamott says there are only two really sincere prayers, which are: “Help me, help me, and thank you, thank you.”

 

Some folks may be uncomfortable with the term “salvation.”  It might help to think of it as the answer to that “help me help me” plea that I believe most of us have felt at some of the hard times in our lives.

 

Just as there are a variety of eschatologies, there are different soteriologies, and the two are linked in interesting ways.

 

Some people see salvation as an individual way to escape the punishment of hell. Many conservative Christians believe that.  Evil came into the world when the devil tempted Eve in the garden.  We are all tainted by this original sin.

In various stories in the Bible, God punished people by floods and other disasters and then finally sent Jesus to die on the cross.  If you believe in Him, you will be saved and will go to heaven after you die or after the world is destroyed in the final days.

 

The response to evil in this soteriology is to defend against it, to avoid evil doers, to try and convert them if possible, and to perhaps punish them in this life as God will in the next.

 

There is a lot of evil in this world view, everyone is a sinner and deserves punishment.  Only by the grace of God can we find a salvation that we don’t really deserve.

 

I frankly find those ideas pretty creepy.  Salvation is defined as being saved from God’s wrath.

 

God is not a loving force in that soteriology, but a being that punishes by sending earthquakes and hurricanes, and sending everyone to hell if they don’t believe just the right things.  It also lets humans off the hook for dealing with the real evil that is in our world and damages life.

 

Luckily, there are other options.

This week, we are in the midst of the Jewish High Holy Days where the faithful review their thoughts and actions and try to make amends for the harm they have done.  It is about getting right with the world, with yourself, with God, and beginning the New Year with your soul refreshed and restored.  That is a form of soteriology. There is also been the belief that what we need to be saved from is not the wrath of God, but the consequences of human sin and human evil, that salvation comes not from holding a specific belief, but from the powers of life, love and goodness that are all around us.  In more liberal Christian theology, Jesus saves by the example of his life and work.  His death was not a sacrifice demanded by God, but the result of the oppressive Roman Empire.  His resurrection, which does not have to be taken literally, is evidence that the powers of life and love can counter and even, at times, defeat evil.

 

But what is evil?  What is sin? Two more tricky concepts.  Some define sin as a rebellion against God.  The liberal theologian, Walter Rauschenbusch, rejects that notion.  He says when theologians speak of rebellion against God, it reminds him of despotic governments which treat every offense as treason.

 

“Our universe is not a monarchy with a despotic God above and humans down below, but a spiritual commonwealth with God in the midst of us.”  For Rauschenbusch and others, sin is not the betrayal of God’s rules, but the betrayal of one another.  Sin of that sort destroys life giving relationships of love and justice.

 

Rebecca Parker says that evil is that which exploits the lives of some to benefit the lives of others.

Evil is not just what individuals do, it hides in systems of oppression, in racism, in anti-Semitism, in sexism, in homophobia, and in economic systems that do not include any protection for those with less power and less money.  Salvation is also not individual.  We save ourselves when we work for a world of justice where everyone is saved.  This fits in well with the social Gospel eschatology of building the Kingdom of heaven here on earth.

 

It also fits well with Universalist eschatology where we will all end up in heaven together – so it only makes sense to try and get along now.

 

I don’t think I have told you the story of the tourist who was taking a tour of heaven?   No?  Maybe some of you have heard it.

 

“An angel takes the tourist around, showing that everything is beautiful and varied.  Some people are chanting in a park, some are sitting in silent meditation by a river, some are laughing and dancing on a hillside.  The tourist then notices some walls that reach up to the sky. What is that?  It is the section for those that wouldn’t be happy if they thought anyone else was here.”

 

Universalism – everyone gets to heaven, even those who want to be alone there.

 

So far we have covered three theologies of salvation.  One says only some are saved.  The criteria can vary depending on the particular group.  Another says that salvation is collective not individual and that when we create a just world with a healthy and sustainable planet we will be saved. The third says that everyone is saved.

 

There is one other soteriology that I want to describe.

It, as far as I know, hasn’t been called radically realized soteriology, but I think it should be.  In this one, the hope for salvation isn’t deferred to another life or tied to success in building a better world, but is realized in the here and now.  Salvation can be defined as what we long for, what we need to feel like our life has meaning.  What do you long for?  What would be your salvation?  What is the metaphorical roof over your life that keeps you from harm.  For me, it is very simply being fully alive, engaged with each other and with the world, staying “woke,” if you will. It is trying to resist evil with patience and wisdom and it is also taking the time to celebrate all that is right with the world.  It isn’t neat; it isn’t particularly easy, but for me it is what being alive is about. We don’t have to lose everything and we don’t have to be kidnapped by a pirate in order to appreciate what is most important.  It isn’t money and it isn’t clothes, it isn’t a job or a house.  You know that.  It also isn’t a dream of an otherworldly paradise, particularly if your vision of such a paradise causes you to be less than kind to others who may not share your specific vision.

 

“Old pirates, yes, they rob I.”  They rob you too.  But we still sing songs of freedom, redemption songs.  We sing them together.  That can be our collective salvation.  Blessed be.

Our Theological House 9-17-17

We’ve got a feast for the spirit here, and a feast for the mind.  Mango thoughts and jalapeno talk. There is nothing bland about the Unitarian Universalists of Petaluma, right?  Oh, yeah.

 

But church should be more than interesting dishes on a potluck line. A church should be a sanctuary, a place for respite from a sometimes painful and frightening world, and a place to give us the energy to live our lives in ways that can make a meaningful difference in the world.

 

While I was in seminary at Starr King, I studied both preaching and theology with Rebecca Parker.  Several years later, I took a class taught by both Rebecca Parker and John Buehrens, a former President of the Unitarian Universalist Association.  We discussed the instructors’ recent book: “A House for Hope, the promise of progressive religion for the twenty first century.” If you are interested in reading it, you can order it online from the UUA bookstore.

 

Their book contains some serious and meaty theology, and presents, I believe, some critical understandings of Unitarian Universalist theology, a theology that help us hold onto both hope and purpose in these challenging times. It is important enough and complex enough, that I am going to do a sermon series on it.  For three weeks in a row, we are going to dive fairly deep into theology.  I hope you are ready for the ride.

 

Parker and Buehrens use the metaphor of a house to explain the theological basis of progressive religion, including, but not limited to, Unitarian Universalism.

This metaphorical house has a foundation and is built in a particular place.  It has walls and rooms, a roof and a doorway.  All of these correspond to categories in systemic theology, which is simply an organized way to look at the different aspects of various religions.

 

Briefly, because this might give some of you a headache, the foundation is how we understand God and the relationship of humans to the divine.  This is theology. The walls are what gather us into a collective space.  This is ecclesiology and includes how our religious community is organized and governed.  The rooms are how we create a welcoming home for the spirit: pneumatology, which includes our rituals and worship practices.  The roof is what protects us from harm: soteriology, the theology of salvation, is what saves us from evil.  The doorway is how we engage with the world: missiology, our mission or reason for being.  Finally, there is our location, which is obviously here on this earth, this planet, but how we see this earth, especially the end of the earth, the end of time, is eschatology.

 

We are going to start with the last one: Eschatology, our location and relationship to the earth, the end of the earth, the end of time.

 

But first, some context:

 

There is a lot to Unitarian Universalism.  We have our seven principles and six sources.  We read the principles earlier, and both the principles and our sources are in the front of the grey hymnal.

The sources help to explain who we are and where we come from, and the principles are good guides for living.  But neither the principles or the sources are actually theology.

 

Some folks confuse theology with creeds, so let me clear that up immediately.  As Unitarian Universalists, we don’t have a creed, no one tells us what we have to believe.  As the song goes, we welcome atheists and redneck Hindus, as well as Pagan Buddhist Jews.  That is part of what we offer to those who would join us.  No one needs to check who they are and what they believe at the door.

 

I know that is very important to many of you.  It was to me when I first found Unitarian Universalism.

 

We don’t have a creed, but we do, my friends, have some particular theological perspectives that influence how we interact with each other and with the world.

 

These perspectives are made up of the various parts I mentioned earlier: theology, ecclesiology, pneumatology, soteriology, missiology, and eschatology.

 

If you can’t remember the definitions of those words, don’t stress.  Think about a house with a foundation, walls, rooms, a roof, and a doorway.

Just like a house, none of these theological parts can stand alone.

How we conceive of the divine affects how we organize our churches.  How we see salvation affects how we determine our mission. How we worship together reflects all of the above.

 

Let’s start with how we see the world and the ultimate purpose of existence.  The most common eschatology in our wider culture here in the United States is the one that goes something like this: God created the world and in the end humanity will meet its maker, be judged and end up in either heaven or in hell. The end of the entire world will come at the end of a cosmic battle between good and evil called Armageddon.  The world will be destroyed, but the faithful will be saved and taken to a new paradise.  This is not what most Unitarian Universalists believe.   As it said in the song, in case of Rapture, pack a snack, ’cause we’ll be left behind.

 

The major problem with that eschatology is that this world, this life, has meaning only so far as it gets us to heaven.  If we believe that, we don’t have to worry about degradation of the environment as it will all be destroyed anyway.  The pain and suffering in our own lives, the oppression so many are forced to live with, doesn’t matter because the rewards will all come after we die.

 

Most Unitarian Universalists don’t believe any of that.  We do worry about the end of the world, more at some times than others, but our fears are about climate change, war, and other disasters, and not the wrath or judgement of some God.

 

There are three eschatologies that can be defined as liberal, all of which have been around at least since the beginning of Christianity.

 

Briefly, these three can be defined as Social Gospel, Universalist, and radically realized eschatology.

All are fairly popular within Unitarian Universalism and many are also shared by other faith traditions.  As I go through, think about which one fits what you believe.

 

Quite of few of our hymns reflect the social gospel eschatology.  “We’ll build a Land” is one of the more obvious.

We are here to build the Kingdom of God here on earth where justice shall roll down like waters and peace like an ever-flowing stream.  This social gospel eschatology is also very popular with Methodists and many Catholics.  The only problem with it is that building heaven on earth is hard work.  You have to feed all of the hungry people in the world, end all oppression, and probably be extremely nice all the time too. It can also be frustrating when the arc of the universe seems to be bending away from justice.  The approach can be inspirational, it can feed the spirit, but if it the only dish served at the church potluck it can also be overwhelming.

 

The second of the more liberal eschatologies is Universalism, which holds, basically, that “God’s love embraces the whole human race: another line from one of our hymns.  If God loves all of us, then we should try to get along. The Universalist faith is in a God of Love who works to bring all into relationship with the divine.

 

The third liberal eschatology is radically realized eschatology. It is radical, because it says heaven is right here and right now. This world and this life are sacred.  We stand on holy ground.  Our task is to recognize that fact and to treat each other and the earth with gentle care and respect.

Jesus said, the kingdom of God is among us.  Moses was told to take off his shoes for the ground he stood on was holy.

With this understanding, we are drawn to repair and heal what is broken, not because it will bring about some perfect future world, but simply because the dance we are doing here is a holy dance. As Rumi says, there are a thousand ways to kneel and kiss the ground.

 

Personally, I like some of all three of the progressive eschatologies.  I still dream of a better world and want to help that come about.  I believe in a God, a sacred source of love and compassion, that loves each and every one of us.  But for my house of hope, I want to live in the radically realized vision, because with that one, heaven is already pretty much here.  Yes, there is pain and suffering, but life is also to be enjoyed and treasured.  Let it be a dance we do, another line from our hymnal, reflects this attitude.

As I said earlier, the parts of a theological house need to fit together.  I am not going to go as deeply into the other parts today, simply because there isn’t time.  We will do more in the next couple of weeks

 

But briefly, some of what we try to do in our worship services relate directly to radically realized eschatology.  We have fun.  We sing joyful songs and we recognize that life itself is a blessing, that it can be simply awesome.  And yes, we can work hard for justice in so many ways, but we also have fun while we do it.  It affects our mission, how we organize ourselves, and how we see God. It helps us figure out how to “let nothing evil cross this door.

It tells us that heaven can be right here, that comfort and healing can be found, not in some far-off place, but right here, right now.

 

That is the hope, a hope that is here because we can feel it among us when we gather together.  We all know about hell.  We all see the damage that is being done by those who believe that this life doesn’t matter, who don’t really care about protecting our planet because they think God will destroy it anyway.

 

We also know heaven.  We see it in the sparkle of our children’s eyes.  We see it in the tenderness of our caring committee.  We feel it in our chalice circles, where we share our stories from deep inside.

 

 

Rebecca Parker and John Buehrens say that to thrive, hope requires a home.

 

Welcome home.

The Fire Rains Down

The fire rains down across the west

Choking smoke and flames

The water rises with the wind

Drowning out our southern lands

 

The drums of war beat loudly

Behind the Nazi chants

Dreams turn into nightmares

None of us are safe

 

I don’t believe in Armageddon

That’s not my kind of God

This horror is not holy

And prayers are not enough

 

Breathe deep with battered lungs

And sing into the howling wind

Beat your hands in time to music

Keep heaven in your heart

 

The roots of love run deep

A taproot to our souls

Be like the mighty redwood

Staying strong amidst the flames.

 

 

 

Snap Your Head

Snap your head

Back over your shoulders

Though it might seem

The world has gone insane

 

No time for dreaming

Lost in the clouds

Of a sweet fantasy land

Where reason might rule

 

Break open your hands

Dig in the dirt

Find the lost souls

Buried in fear

 

Wind up your wisdom

Carry your load

Speak when you’re able

As loud as you can

 

The rain is still falling

The flood waters burn

With the acid of lies

From clouds of despair

 

Pack up your troubles

And lend me a hand

If we stay woke

We might witness the dawn

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resist, Rejoice, and Renew – UUP 8-20-2017

 

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Some words by Jonipher Kwong, a poem entitled

Faithless Works:

They say faith without works is dead

So I worked for equality

Next to my queer friends who wanted to get married

And I worked for religious freedom

Next to my Muslim friends who were accused of being terrorists

And I worked for racial justice

Next to my black friends whose lives were affected by police brutality

Yet I didn’t feel fully alive even after working myself to death

Until I let my work become a spiritual practice

Until I let go of my attachment to the outcome

Until I stopped chasing after political issues, one after another

I still believe faith without works is dead

But works without faith is just as lifeless

 

I was an activist before I was religious, and those words ring true for me.  Without some type of faith, political engagement can really suck the joy out of life.  There are always defeats and disappointments, hard fought progress is stopped or, worse, reversed.  Despair, frustration, and bitterness can grow until one can forget to treat even friends with kindness.  Infighting and misplaced righteousness has torn many a positive movement apart.

 

I have experienced that, I have seen it and I have lived it.  Many of you have lived it too.  Sometimes it even happens in churches.

 

I was worried when I went to New Orleans in June for our Unitarian Universalist General Assembly. A pattern of white supremacy within our association had been called out by brave Unitarian Universalists of color. There was defensiveness and some serious mistakes by some of our leadership which resulted in some significant resignations, including that of our national President.  Our well-respected Moderator was diagnosed with a fast-moving cancer and he died within a matter of weeks. Both of our two nationally elected offices were vacant.

 

What was going to happen?  Would our faith be torn apart by the same forces that were tearing apart our country and the whole world?   Would we find the courage and wisdom to resist not only the forces of evil that surrounded us, but also the fear that lived inside of us?

 

So, I was very worried.  I knew what was happening within was in part the result of what was going on in the world.  After the election, people of color, queer people, people with disabilities of all kinds, people who identify as Jewish or Muslim, immigrants, felt even more vulnerable than they had before.  The list goes on to include everyone who is marginalized in some way, even women who are a majority in numbers but not in power, and of course that list includes all of the people that love someone whose very worth and dignity, whose actual life in many cases, is under direct attack.

 

So no wonder, so no wonder, that folks became more sensitive to instances of white supremacy, of sexism, of all the “isms” that afflict our culture, even the culture of our faith tradition.

 

I worried, but I shouldn’t have.  I should have had more faith that who we are as Unitarian Universalists would help us through even this hard time.

 

My experience at both General Assembly and Ministry Days was simply amazing, and renewed my faith and my commitment.

 

Our national board named three African American co-presidents who led with grace, compassion, and courage.  The Minister’s association’s worship included voices of ministers of color and other marginalized groups who spoke their truths as clearly as they described their visions.  Co-moderators were appointed who led the business portions of our meetings with humor, transparency, and a flexibility that was a real joy to witness.

 

We tackled white supremacy in numerous workshops and in healing spaces reserved for people of color.

 

That work is far from done – Let me share an example of something I learned in one of the workshops, something that I don’t think was a part of the lesson plan.  The workshop was described as a place to sing some of the music in our hymnal that comes out of the African American heritage.  The room was crowded and it was clear there weren’t going to be enough hymnals for those sitting in the back.  As often happens, there were plenty of seats up front.  The workshop leader asked those in the back to move up front so they could share a hymnal.  And then, a white woman in the back questioned this, saying it would be much better if some of the hymnals were handed to those in the back.

It was subtle, it was likely unconscious, but it was a clear example of how white supremacy can function in a religiously liberal setting.  I caught the eye of the African American woman sitting next to me who also noticed the sense of entitlement that seemed to prompt that demand.  The facilitator simply said no, we aren’t going to do that.  Too often white folks think we know better and that our needs and ideas should take priority, even if we are late to the party.  Listening, really listening, to the stories and experiences of a very diverse Unitarian Universalism was an important part of that week in New Orleans.

 

It was a joy that our youth from this church were there to experience it as well.  Next week, they will be sharing some of their experiences with you.

 

I could go on about general assembly, it was a full and fruitful time.

 

But our world keeps turning, and there is going to be an eclipse of the sun – tomorrow, yes?

 

What a metaphor a solar eclipse is.  Especially for us, who light our chalice each week for the light of truth, the warmth of love and the energy of action.  We cannot let that light go out.  We cannot let the forces of hate and bigotry, we cannot let fascism, because that is what it is, we cannot let it blot out our sun or dim our chalice.  The symbol of our chalice, as most of you know, was created during WWII when we, as a faith, took a stand against the Nazi regime and all it stood for.

 

Many Unitarian Universalists were in Charlottesville last weekend, including Susan Frederick Gray, our newly elected national president, the first woman to ever serve in that position.  Arm in arm with her were other clergy, including Jeanne Pupke, who had run against Susan in one of the pleasantest elections I have ever witnessed.  Many were trained, many were veterans of non-violent resistance actions.  Facing armed Nazi’s screaming racist, homophobic, and anti-Semitic curses at them was a very different experience than they had ever had before.  What courage that took.  What faith they had.

 

They were not safe.  They could have, and almost were, beaten.  They could have been killed.  Heather Heyer was murdered that day and many others were hurt.

 

During WWII no one was really safe from the Nazis, and I believe no one is safe today.  They have come for the immigrants already.  They have attacked Mosques and synagogues, they have burned down the houses of gay activists as happened in Michigan a couple of weeks ago.

 

What is happening is frightening; it can be overwhelming; and it can freeze our souls to numbness and despair.

 

We need to resist this evil with all that is in us, and we can do so with joy, rejoicing in the fact that we are not alone in this struggle against hate.  We can do so with faith, knowing that as long as we remain true to our values, with our tradition as a guide, and the power of love as our engine, the forces of evil will not prevail.  Our spirits will be renewed and our world restored.

 

I will end with these words by Anne Barker.  She names the pain and she names the love that abides:

 

When the Unimaginable Happened

 

When we heard the news, saw the wreckage, felt the paralyzing blow…

Our hearts broke open – and spilled out – into our hands

And there we were

Watching our Love seep between our fingers

Watching our fragile Love pour out all over us.

Watching our Love seem to slip away.

 

When the unimaginable happened,

The ache we felt-

As if Love was being lost

Was the ache of Love’s despairing truth.

 

This is the Love that no one chooses,

the loss so out of order, so profound,

the Love we did not ever want to know.

 

And yet, the source of this despair,

the reason our hearts cleave and flow,

is because they know the fullness.

 

This is the Love of truth and beauty,

Love that spans the web of being,

Uniting each of us within its timeless form.

 

When we heard the news,

Our hearts broke open, spilled into our hands

And there we stared at Love, lamenting,

“What am I to do with this?”

 

And with these raw and tender yearnings

We will – beat after precious beat-

Seek wholeness once again

 

It will take time to find our balance

To grieve, if we will make the room.

Remember, friends, this is the right thing

This ache within our deepest beings.

Know that all these things are normal

To feel disrupted, empty or undone.

 

Our hearts broke open and the Love that is still true

Draws us once again together, story by story, step by step,

Into places of tender knowing, remembering

To restore us, mend us, piece by broken piece.

 

This is the Love that runs between us,

Sustaining force of restoration,

The Love that nourishes and feeds us,

Binds us, each, to our collective core.

 

We grieve…and march….and weep….and sing

And through the pain – but not despite it –

Love will repair us, not the same, but stronger in some places,

Honoring memories like treasures,

Living out our lives’ potential

In the shadow of the trespass

In the warmth of one another

In the light of what, restored, we will become.

 

May it be so, Blessed Be.

 

 

 

When I Wake

Sometimes when I wake

I am not sure

Where I have been

Dreams are like that

A soft focus

Vague outlines

An imagined universe

Where the rules

Never quite apply

 

Sometimes when I stop

Doing whatever it was

That kept me busy

I am not sure

Where I am

What kind of world is this?

A harsh light

Batters my eyes

And I awake

To the suffering

All around our world

 

Hold me in a dream

Bring me home

To that land

Where hope

Love and justice thrive

Peace at last

A soft focus

A sweet dream

 

 

Grief #Orlando

Remembering, a year later..

Sermons, Poetry, and Other Musings

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Where will our grief go

If our tears should ever dry?

Where will our fear go

If our heartbeats ever slow down again?

Where will our rage go

If our bodies ever stop their shaking?

Our lives, our loves, are a river

Try to damn it though they do

Kill us with bullets and Bibles

Ban us from bathrooms

And let the white rapists go free.

Hearts breaking,

Bodies shaking

Still we flow

On forever on

Until we finally swim free

In that warm sea

Filled by our tears.

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Tired and Yearning

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“Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed, to me:
I lift my lamp beside the golden door.”  – Emma Lazerous

 

Tired so tired

We need another golden door.

Our own poor masses

No longer can breathe

The toxic soup of lies

That spew from factories of hate

 

Refuse fills our beaches

While children drown

On other shores

Homeless walk the streets

Of every town

In our “good ole USA”

 

Time to huddle

Time to pray

Time to plot

And way past time

To lift our lamps

Raising our voices

High and clear.

 

Yearning

Working

To  dry the tears

Of our Lady, Liberty.

 

Zip Line

Clean and sharp as a zip line

The truth zings down

Old vines, twisted leaves

Can only cover

The truth so long

 

Fasten your harness

Carry water and snacks

It is going to be

An amazing ride

At a frightful height

 

Hold onto the truth

Hold onto the line

Balance is everything

Brute strength alone

Won’t keep us down.